Monday, April 27, 2015

Infectious disease

App lets gamers play Disease Detective

Tuesday, March 17, 2015, 6:30 AM
“Solve the Outbreak,” a free app developed for the general public by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, immerses game players in the world of Disease Detectives, the CDC’s equivalent of a SWAT team. These members of the Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) are the on-the-ground... Read more

Life, liberty, and the right to infect others with measles: Rand Paul on vaccination

Monday, February 9, 2015, 6:30 AM
Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky confirmed his membership in the “doctors who shouldn’t have gone into politics” club with his comments last week supporting the right of parents who don’t want their kids to be immunized. While acknowledging vaccines to be “one of the greatest... Read more

Chris Christie, vaccinologist? Measles expert?

Friday, February 6, 2015, 6:30 AM
New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie is rightfully taking a drubbing this week for his comments about the measles vaccine and his claim that parents "need to have some measure of choice" about vaccinating their children. In the midst of what threatens to be the worst year for measles in the United States... Read more

How is your local hospital doing? Combating hospital-acquired infections

Thursday, November 20, 2014, 5:30 AM
During the last weeks, as Americans watched health care workers don protective equipment before treating patients in West Africa with Ebola, I was donning my own protective garb—a yellow hospital gown and purple gloves—so that I could visit a friend in the hospital. She had Clostridium Difficile... Read more

Ebola quarantines: nurses' perspective

Tuesday, November 18, 2014, 6:30 AM
The Ebola crisis in West Africa continues to rage unabated. The suffering of adults, children, and communities is unparalleled. In fact, the World Health Organization estimates that nearly 5,000 people have died, including more than 300 healthcare workers. The lack of public infrastructure, including... Read more

Hitching a ride with Ebola: opportunism

Thursday, October 30, 2014, 6:30 AM
The 1918 influenza pandemic killed 50 to 100 million people around the world. The death toll is uncertain because we do not have good figures from China, India, and other parts of Asia. One thing we do know, where some saw death, others saw opportunity. Quack remedies-to cure quickly appeared on... Read more

Why not ban travel to stop Ebola?

Friday, October 24, 2014, 6:30 AM
Ebola is rightly frightening people worldwide because of its graphic symptoms, high mortality rates, and perceived infectivity. Over the past few weeks, as we watched one man in Dallas die from Ebola and two of his health providers battle it–with another, unrelated case identified Thursday night... Read more

Yellow fever and Ebola: similar scourges, centuries apart

Tuesday, October 21, 2014, 6:30 AM
The disease is terrifying. Many of the stricken are left in the streets to die horrible deaths, their bodies unclaimed. Thousands flee. The government appears helpless to stop the scourge from spreading. Physicians and nurses offer care, but have no effective methods of treatment or means to prevent... Read more

Are we prepared for the next emergency?

Tuesday, September 30, 2014, 6:30 AM
Our ability to stop terrorists from turning passenger planes into missiles wasn't the nation's only deficiency back 13 years ago. The public health system wasn't fully prepared for emergencies like anthrax either. What progress have federal and state governments made in recent years to protect... Read more

Blaming moms for vaccine trends

Wednesday, September 24, 2014, 6:30 AM
Across the country, worries about children’s vaccination rates have accelerated in light of outbreaks of measles and pertussis and the growing number of children whose parents have withheld one or more vaccines because of personal beliefs. In news reports on these trends, parents who forgo vaccines... Read more
About this blog

What is public health — and why does it matter?

Through prevention, education, and intervention, public health practitioners - epidemiologists, health policy experts, municipal workers, environmental health scientists - work to keep us healthy.

It’s not always easy. Michael Yudell, Jonathan Purtle, and other contributors tell you why.

Michael Yudell, PhD, MPH Associate Professor, Drexel University School of Public Health
Jonathan Purtle, DrPH, MSc Assistant Professor, Drexel University School of Public Health
Janet Golden, PhD Professor of history, Rutgers University-Camden
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