Friday, October 31, 2014
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History

Charles Atlas: unlikely public health educator

Friday, August 8, 2014, 6:30 AM
Would you take health advice from a man in leopard-print trunks? Several generations of young men have–by sending away for Charles Atlas’s Dynamic Tension System. This was a mail-order subscription series of illustrated lessons in exercise, diet and health, presented as a series of letters... Read more

Ebola: fears, truths, answers, and actions

Tuesday, August 5, 2014, 6:30 AM
We are getting a lot of news about the ebola virus. Yes, it is extraordinarily deadly and outbreaks can have a case fatality rate of up to 90 percent. Yes, it has now spread to another country, Nigeria, And triggered some fears-but, so far, no diagnoses-in New York. The death toll in Africa is now... Read more

Can you trust open-access journals?

Friday, August 1, 2014, 6:30 AM
Just arrived in my email inbox: Dear Dr. Jonathan Purtle, Greetings!!! We solicit your valuable contribution for the Journal Family Medicine & Medical Science Research … Dear Researcher, publish in the International Journal of Medical and Applied Sciences … Decision on your paper... Read more

Plague and quarantine: An old (and ongoing) practice

Thursday, July 24, 2014, 6:30 AM
Every July in Italy, Venice the Festa del Redentore (Feast of the Redeemer) celebrates the city’s deliverance from the plague, which killed 50,000 people – in Venice – between 1576 and 1577. (A mass grave of victims was dug up five years ago.) That two-year epidemic was one of the... Read more

Rickets returns: Whatever happened to cod liver oil?

Friday, July 18, 2014, 6:00 AM
Rickets, a disease caused by a lack of calcium and vitamin D that leads to softening of the bones and bone deformities is reportedly on the rise in the United States and elsewhere. Once the most common nutritional disease of children, Rickets caused bowlegs and other problems such as deformed pelvises... Read more

Care for all: A look back at Philadelphia General Hospital

Tuesday, July 15, 2014, 6:30 AM
I moved to Philadelphia in 1976, and the first thing on my agenda was to get a job. After making the rounds of several hospitals, I made my way to Philadelphia General Hospital (PGH) and applied for a faculty position in its school of nursing. Philadelphia General Hospital, a tax supported municipal... Read more

Visiting public health history: Ellis Island

Tuesday, June 17, 2014, 6:30 AM
Twelve million people passed through the Ellis Island, New York’s immigration station between 1892 and 1954. Before entering the United States, third-class passengers underwent a visual medical inspection by officers of the United States Public Health Service. The woman in the image above is having... Read more

The link between felon disenfranchisement, politics, and health

Wednesday, June 11, 2014, 6:30 AM
Consider two things: - Life expectancy at birth for an African American male born in Philadelphia is 7.6 years shorter than a white male (67.5 years vs. 75.1). - About 13% of African American men in the United States are prohibited from voting compared to 2.5% of the general voting age... Read more

What is a diagnosis? A cause, not a victim.

Thursday, June 5, 2014, 6:30 AM
Viewing the HBO movie “The Normal Heart” – showing again Sunday and next Thursday and Friday – brings you vividly back to the beginning of HIV/AIDS in New York City in the early 1980s. People are struggling with a deadly illness that had no identified cause, a range of symptoms... Read more

World No Tobacco Day: A brief review

Saturday, May 31, 2014, 12:21 AM
It was a half-century ago that the U.S. Surgeon General's Report on Smoking and Health alerted Americans to the risks of smoking. You can read the entire document here. The report's history is a featured exhibit at the Lyndon Baines Johnson Presidential Library in Austin, Texas. Did you know that... Read more
About this blog

What is public health — and why does it matter?

Through prevention, education, and intervention, public health practitioners - epidemiologists, health policy experts, municipal workers, environmental health scientists - work to keep us healthy.

It’s not always easy. Michael Yudell, Jonathan Purtle, and other contributors tell you why.

Michael Yudell, PhD, MPH Associate Professor, Drexel University School of Public Health
Jonathan Purtle, DrPH, MSc Assistant Professor, Drexel University School of Public Health
Janet Golden, PhD Professor of history, Rutgers University-Camden
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