Saturday, December 20, 2014

History

Ferguson: A tale of health disparities

Wednesday, December 10, 2014, 5:30 AM
This post is part of an exchange between The Public's Health and the Barbara Bates Center for the Study of the History of Nursing at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing. With the recent grand jury decision not to indict police officer Darren Wilson for the shooting death of Michael Brown... Read more

Footwear and public health: “My shoes are killing me!”

Wednesday, December 3, 2014, 5:30 AM
High heeled shoes, once worn exclusively by rich men and women (thus the term “well-heeled”) are now the topic of public health warnings. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, lists high heels as a falling hazard on its “Prom Health and Safety” tip sheet. The American... Read more

Tobaccoism: “Rapidity in the spread of a disease-producing vice”

Wednesday, November 26, 2014, 5:30 AM
This post is part of an exchange between The Public's Health and “Books, Health, and History,” a blog at the New York Academy of Medicine. The third Thursday of November was designated the Great American Smokeout back in 1976. Since then it has gained national attention and helped precipitate... Read more

Ebola quarantines: nurses' perspective

Tuesday, November 18, 2014, 6:30 AM
The Ebola crisis in West Africa continues to rage unabated. The suffering of adults, children, and communities is unparalleled. In fact, the World Health Organization estimates that nearly 5,000 people have died, including more than 300 healthcare workers. The lack of public infrastructure, including... Read more

A bipartisan success at getting drugs to the pharmacy faster (and cheaper)

Wednesday, November 5, 2014, 6:30 AM
Most medications used to be expensive – much more expensive than they are today. As recently as the early 1980s, most important drugs on the market were brand names under patent protection. Generics were uncommon; the cost of developing and marketing them in competition with the big brands was... Read more

Hitching a ride with Ebola: opportunism

Thursday, October 30, 2014, 6:30 AM
The 1918 influenza pandemic killed 50 to 100 million people around the world. The death toll is uncertain because we do not have good figures from China, India, and other parts of Asia. One thing we do know, where some saw death, others saw opportunity. Quack remedies-to cure quickly appeared on... Read more

Yellow fever and Ebola: similar scourges, centuries apart

Tuesday, October 21, 2014, 6:30 AM
The disease is terrifying. Many of the stricken are left in the streets to die horrible deaths, their bodies unclaimed. Thousands flee. The government appears helpless to stop the scourge from spreading. Physicians and nurses offer care, but have no effective methods of treatment or means to prevent... Read more

The politics of childbirth: An interview with Paula Michaels

Friday, October 10, 2014, 9:19 AM
Did you know that Lamaze, a well-known childbirth method originated in the Soviet Union? The politics of pain relief in childbirth has a fascinating history, revealed by historian Paula Michaels. What is Lamaze? Historically, the Lamaze method, also known as psychoprophylaxis, was is a way of giving... Read more

A century after W.E.B. Du Bois, science still gets race wrong

Friday, October 3, 2014, 6:30 AM
Most of us today don’t know the name W.E.B. Du Bois. But we should. Du Bois’s pioneering sociological work on race (books like The Philadelphia Negro and The Souls of Black Folk) and his leadership at the forefront of civil rights struggles (including a founder of the National Association... Read more

Are we prepared for the next emergency?

Tuesday, September 30, 2014, 6:30 AM
Our ability to stop terrorists from turning passenger planes into missiles wasn't the nation's only deficiency back 13 years ago. The public health system wasn't fully prepared for emergencies like anthrax either. What progress have federal and state governments made in recent years to protect... Read more
About this blog

What is public health — and why does it matter?

Through prevention, education, and intervention, public health practitioners - epidemiologists, health policy experts, municipal workers, environmental health scientists - work to keep us healthy.

It’s not always easy. Michael Yudell, Jonathan Purtle, and other contributors tell you why.

Michael Yudell, PhD, MPH Associate Professor, Drexel University School of Public Health
Jonathan Purtle, DrPH, MSc Assistant Professor, Drexel University School of Public Health
Janet Golden, PhD Professor of history, Rutgers University-Camden
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