Saturday, November 1, 2014
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History

Hitching a ride with Ebola: opportunism

Thursday, October 30, 2014, 6:30 AM
The 1918 influenza pandemic killed 50 to 100 million people around the world. The death toll is uncertain because we do not have good figures from China, India, and other parts of Asia. One thing we do know, where some saw death, others saw opportunity. Quack remedies-to cure quickly appeared on... Read more

Yellow fever and Ebola: similar scourges, centuries apart

Tuesday, October 21, 2014, 6:30 AM
The disease is terrifying. Many of the stricken are left in the streets to die horrible deaths, their bodies unclaimed. Thousands flee. The government appears helpless to stop the scourge from spreading. Physicians and nurses offer care, but have no effective methods of treatment or means to prevent... Read more

The politics of childbirth: An interview with Paula Michaels

Friday, October 10, 2014, 9:19 AM
Did you know that Lamaze, a well-known childbirth method originated in the Soviet Union? The politics of pain relief in childbirth has a fascinating history, revealed by historian Paula Michaels. What is Lamaze? Historically, the Lamaze method, also known as psychoprophylaxis, was is a way of giving... Read more

A century after W.E.B. Du Bois, science still gets race wrong

Friday, October 3, 2014, 6:30 AM
Most of us today don’t know the name W.E.B. Du Bois. But we should. Du Bois’s pioneering sociological work on race (books like The Philadelphia Negro and The Souls of Black Folk) and his leadership at the forefront of civil rights struggles (including a founder of the National Association... Read more

Are we prepared for the next emergency?

Tuesday, September 30, 2014, 6:30 AM
Our ability to stop terrorists from turning passenger planes into missiles wasn't the nation's only deficiency back 13 years ago. The public health system wasn't fully prepared for emergencies like anthrax either. What progress have federal and state governments made in recent years to protect... Read more

Blaming moms for vaccine trends

Wednesday, September 24, 2014, 6:30 AM
Across the country, worries about children’s vaccination rates have accelerated in light of outbreaks of measles and pertussis and the growing number of children whose parents have withheld one or more vaccines because of personal beliefs. In news reports on these trends, parents who forgo vaccines... Read more

You’ve heard of Plan B? Now there’s Plan C

Wednesday, September 10, 2014, 6:30 AM
“Abortion by Mail” was the name of a provocative cover story in the Aug. 31 issue of the New York Times Magazine. The article describes efforts by reproductive rights activists to create “virtual clinics” by making the abortion inducing drugs mifepristone and misoprostol available... Read more

Ben Franklin’s Treatise on Wind

Thursday, August 21, 2014, 6:00 AM
Benjamin Franklin was a man for the ages. His story is a familiar one. Born in Boston in 1706. The youngest of 17 children. Moved to Philadelphia in 1723. He gained fame for his experiments with electricity, and was a philosopher, diplomat, inventor, and scientist. He also was a specialist in another... Read more

Historical antecedents to experimental Ebola treatments

Tuesday, August 19, 2014, 6:00 AM
We had the chance this week to sit down with physician and historian Scott Podolsky to discuss the history of serum therapy, the treatment for Ebola first provided to Americans Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol and now given to three health workers in Liberia. Podolsky is Associate Professor of Global... Read more

Skip baseball, watch a movie

Tuesday, August 12, 2014, 6:30 AM
The Phillies are having a dismal season (and that is the politest term I can think of for describing it). So, there’s no need to sit down at night and watch another game. Turn off the TV and turn on the computer and you can stream some films about public health. Or visit your local library and... Read more
About this blog

What is public health — and why does it matter?

Through prevention, education, and intervention, public health practitioners - epidemiologists, health policy experts, municipal workers, environmental health scientists - work to keep us healthy.

It’s not always easy. Michael Yudell, Jonathan Purtle, and other contributors tell you why.

Michael Yudell, PhD, MPH Associate Professor, Drexel University School of Public Health
Jonathan Purtle, DrPH, MSc Assistant Professor, Drexel University School of Public Health
Janet Golden, PhD Professor of history, Rutgers University-Camden
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