Thursday, May 28, 2015

Set aside 'Little Orphan Annie.' How do we really deal with unwanted kids?

Tuesday, February 3, 2015, 6:30 AM
Americans prefer stories about our most vulnerable youngsters to have a happy ending, like the comic book character “Little Orphan Annie,” so popular that she returned as a musical and was recently remade into the move “Annie” It allows us to indulge in the fantasy that plucky... Read more

New website promotes over-the-counter birth control pills

Tuesday, January 27, 2015, 11:07 AM
Last month, the non-profit organization Ibis Reproductive Health launched a website entitled Free the Pill. The new website is designed to educate the public about why a nonprescription oral contraceptive is needed. (You can’t buy the Pill on the site.) In the run-up to November’s mid-term... Read more

Should teens get to say ‘no’ to life-saving medical treatment?

Friday, January 23, 2015, 6:30 AM
Two weeks ago, the Connecticut Supreme Court ruled in favor of a Hartford Hospital forcing chemotherapy on Cassandra C., a 17-year-old girl with Hodgkin's lymphoma, concluding that she was not a “mature minor” in the legal sense of the term and was therefore unable to refuse such life-saving... Read more

Why Surgeon General’s confirmation is a good thing

Tuesday, January 20, 2015, 6:30 AM
Dr. Vivek Murthy, who during his more-than-year-long-nomination process faced blistering criticism for his position linking gun violence and public health, was finally confirmed last month as the 19th Surgeon General of the United States. Dr. Murthy’s nomination had languished, in large part,... Read more

The Diabetes Blues

Tuesday, January 13, 2015, 6:30 AM
Lord, I’m sick an’ down Can’t tell my head from my feet Lord, I’m sick an’ down Can’t hardly tell my head from my feet Well, I got the sugar diabetes Somebody please. Lord have mercy on me. When Delta Blues guitarist and singer Big Joe Williams sang... Read more

Food Safety: An interview with Dara Alpert Lieberman

Saturday, January 10, 2015, 3:00 AM
Food Safety is vital to our public health. According to a recently released report from the US Department of Agriculture, “Salmonella causes an estimated $3.7 billion each year in medical costs for Americans.” And that’s just one of many foodborne pathogens. I interviewed Dara Alpert... Read more

Public Health in Philadelphia and Beyond: An Interview with Ana V. Diez Roux, Dean of the Drexel School of Public Health

Wednesday, January 7, 2015, 5:30 AM
Ana V. Diez Roux, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H. a physician and epidemiologist, became Dean of the Drexel School of Public Health in early 2014. Her biographical details and information about her scholarship can be found here. I interviewed her about her vision for the Drexel School of Public Health, her views... Read more

Mass Incarceration: A Public Health Epidemic

Tuesday, December 23, 2014, 9:34 AM
We’re number one; and that’s not a good thing. Compared to other countries, the US imprisons the most people in the world, and among developed nations, leads in both the number and proportion of imprisoned people. Since the 1970s, the correctional population in the US has ballooned by 700... Read more

Ferguson: A tale of health disparities

Wednesday, December 10, 2014, 5:30 AM
This post is part of an exchange between The Public's Health and the Barbara Bates Center for the Study of the History of Nursing at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing. With the recent grand jury decision not to indict police officer Darren Wilson for the shooting death of Michael Brown... Read more

Footwear and public health: “My shoes are killing me!”

Wednesday, December 3, 2014, 5:30 AM
High heeled shoes, once worn exclusively by rich men and women (thus the term “well-heeled”) are now the topic of public health warnings. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, lists high heels as a falling hazard on its “Prom Health and Safety” tip sheet. The American... Read more
About this blog

What is public health — and why does it matter?

Through prevention, education, and intervention, public health practitioners - epidemiologists, health policy experts, municipal workers, environmental health scientists - work to keep us healthy.

It’s not always easy. Michael Yudell, Jonathan Purtle, and other contributors tell you why.

Michael Yudell, PhD, MPH Associate Professor, Drexel University School of Public Health
Jonathan Purtle, DrPH, MSc Assistant Professor, Drexel University School of Public Health
Janet Golden, PhD Professor of history, Rutgers University-Camden
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