Friday, October 31, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Hitching a ride with Ebola: opportunism

Thursday, October 30, 2014, 6:30 AM
The 1918 influenza pandemic killed 50 to 100 million people around the world. The death toll is uncertain because we do not have good figures from China, India, and other parts of Asia. One thing we do know, where some saw death, others saw opportunity. Quack remedies-to cure quickly appeared on... Read more

Preventing drug deaths in Pa.: moving forward, too slowly

Tuesday, October 28, 2014, 6:30 AM
Over the past few months the Pennsylvania legislature has taken some important steps forward in addressing the burgeoning epidemic of opioid overdoses in this state. But before we start applauding – let’s take a moment to review where we are, what the legislation will and will not do, and... Read more

Why not ban travel to stop Ebola?

Friday, October 24, 2014, 6:30 AM
Ebola is rightly frightening people worldwide because of its graphic symptoms, high mortality rates, and perceived infectivity. Over the past few weeks, as we watched one man in Dallas die from Ebola and two of his health providers battle it–with another, unrelated case identified Thursday night... Read more

Yellow fever and Ebola: similar scourges, centuries apart

Tuesday, October 21, 2014, 6:30 AM
The disease is terrifying. Many of the stricken are left in the streets to die horrible deaths, their bodies unclaimed. Thousands flee. The government appears helpless to stop the scourge from spreading. Physicians and nurses offer care, but have no effective methods of treatment or means to prevent... Read more

Syracuse University can teach us a lot about Ebola panic

Friday, October 17, 2014, 5:45 PM
Shame on Syracuse University for proving a point—that panic and bad behavior in the wake of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa threatens us as well. The Washington Post reported Friday that Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist Michel du Cille was disinvited by Syracuse to a journalism workshop... Read more

The politics of childbirth: An interview with Paula Michaels

Friday, October 10, 2014, 9:19 AM
Did you know that Lamaze, a well-known childbirth method originated in the Soviet Union? The politics of pain relief in childbirth has a fascinating history, revealed by historian Paula Michaels. What is Lamaze? Historically, the Lamaze method, also known as psychoprophylaxis, was is a way of giving... Read more

Generic drugs: An interview with Jeremy Greene

Tuesday, October 7, 2014, 5:30 AM
Perhaps you’ve noticed on the bottom of a prescription form the words “may substitute” below the doctor’s signature. Maybe you’ve seen your generic medication change color or size when you’ve gotten a prescription renewed. But have you ever wondered about the history... Read more

A century after W.E.B. Du Bois, science still gets race wrong

Friday, October 3, 2014, 6:30 AM
Most of us today don’t know the name W.E.B. Du Bois. But we should. Du Bois’s pioneering sociological work on race (books like The Philadelphia Negro and The Souls of Black Folk) and his leadership at the forefront of civil rights struggles (including a founder of the National Association... Read more

Are we prepared for the next emergency?

Tuesday, September 30, 2014, 6:30 AM
Our ability to stop terrorists from turning passenger planes into missiles wasn't the nation's only deficiency back 13 years ago. The public health system wasn't fully prepared for emergencies like anthrax either. What progress have federal and state governments made in recent years to protect... Read more

Facing the concussion risks of youth football

Friday, September 26, 2014, 6:30 AM
After years of denying the link between football and brain disease, this month the National Football League’s own experts calculated that nearly one third of its players will go on to develop long-term cognitive problems after retirement. The league’s new stance might help shift public... Read more
About this blog

What is public health — and why does it matter?

Through prevention, education, and intervention, public health practitioners - epidemiologists, health policy experts, municipal workers, environmental health scientists - work to keep us healthy.

It’s not always easy. Michael Yudell, Jonathan Purtle, and other contributors tell you why.

Michael Yudell, PhD, MPH Associate Professor, Drexel University School of Public Health
Jonathan Purtle, DrPH, MSc Assistant Professor, Drexel University School of Public Health
Janet Golden, PhD Professor of history, Rutgers University-Camden
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