Sunday, July 5, 2015

Hug a tree: It just might be keeping you healthy

Intriguing new research suggests a relationship between tree density and human health. Anneclaire De Roos analyzes the evidence on her blog, Living With Health Risks.

Hug a tree: It just might be keeping you healthy

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Seems pretty obvious . . . (AP Photo/dpa, Federico Gambarini)
Seems pretty obvious . . . (AP Photo/dpa, Federico Gambarini)

By the time we are adults, the role of trees in our lives is largely reduced to providing shade and making us grateful that there are enough of them around to pump oxygen into the air we breathe. Long gone, too, are the days when a good tree to climb was challenging fun – or when we carved the name of someone we loved into its bark.

But don’t fret. There may be good reason to fall in love with trees all over again. Several new studies draw attention to the relationship between tree density and human health. My colleague at the Drexel University School of Public Health, Anneclaire De Roos, analyzes several new studies examining this relationship on her blog, Living With Health Risks. It makes for a very interesting read. Take a look. And hug a tree.


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About this blog

What is public health — and why does it matter?

Through prevention, education, and intervention, public health practitioners - epidemiologists, health policy experts, municipal workers, environmental health scientists - work to keep us healthy.

It’s not always easy. Michael Yudell, Jonathan Purtle, and other contributors tell you why.

Michael Yudell, PhD, MPH Associate Professor, Drexel University School of Public Health
Jonathan Purtle, DrPH, MSc Assistant Professor, Drexel University School of Public Health
Janet Golden, PhD Professor of history, Rutgers University-Camden
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