Wednesday, February 10, 2016

Fraudulent Studies Disappear, But Not Without a Sound (Thanks to 'Retraction Watch')

Scientific journals pride themselves on holding researchers to the highest standards. So when a previously published study is later found to be wrong, editors "retract" it. Problem is, the original is highly publicized while the retraction is not.

Fraudulent Studies Disappear, But Not Without a Sound (Thanks to 'Retraction Watch')

0 comments

Medical journals and other peer-reviewed publications pride themselves on holding researchers to the highest standards of ethical and scientific integrity.  So when it’s later discovered that data in a published study were fraudulent or that human subjects were treated in an unethical manner, editors “retract” the article—removing it from the journal’s archives and making it seem as if the article was never published in the first place.

While the results of many high-profile studies are often widely publicized, their retractions rarely are—until Retraction Watch was launched, that is.

Retraction Watch is a blog that tracks retracted papers—and, in my opinion, is pretty darn interesting and important.  Started in 2010 by Ivan Oransky and Adam Marcus, both well-accomplished medical writers, Retraction Watch has gained acclaim from publications like Nature and The Wall Street Journal.

At times, Retraction Watch reads like a baseball website as the bloggers pore over statistics for researchers notorious for having their papers retracted—German anesthesiologist Joachim Boldt, for example, who had 89 studies retracted!

More coverage

In the spirit of Auld Lang Syne, Retraction Watch provided a 2011 Year in Review of Retractions to close out the year. Some of the most popular posts:


Read more about The Public's Health.

0 comments
We encourage respectful comments but reserve the right to delete anything that doesn't contribute to an engaging dialogue.
Help us moderate this thread by flagging comments that violate our guidelines.

Comment policy:

Philly.com comments are intended to be civil, friendly conversations. Please treat other participants with respect and in a way that you would want to be treated. You are responsible for what you say. And please, stay on topic. If you see an objectionable post, please report it to us using the "Report Abuse" option.

Please note that comments are monitored by Philly.com staff. We reserve the right at all times to remove any information or materials that are unlawful, threatening, abusive, libelous, defamatory, obscene, vulgar, pornographic, profane, indecent or otherwise objectionable. Personal attacks, especially on other participants, are not permitted. We reserve the right to permanently block any user who violates these terms and conditions.

Additionally comments that are long, have multiple paragraph breaks, include code, or include hyperlinks may not be posted.

Read 0 comments
 
comments powered by Disqus
About this blog

What is public health — and why does it matter?

Through prevention, education, and intervention, public health practitioners - epidemiologists, health policy experts, municipal workers, environmental health scientists - work to keep us healthy.

It’s not always easy. Michael Yudell, Jonathan Purtle, and other contributors tell you why.

Michael Yudell, PhD, MPH Associate Professor, Dornsife School of Public Health, Drexel University
Jonathan Purtle, DrPH, MSc Assistant Professor, Drexel University School of Public Health
Janet Golden, PhD Professor of history, Rutgers University-Camden
Latest Health Videos
Also on Philly.com:
letter icon Newsletter