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Archive: May, 2012

Surprising role for the Post Office: protection against bioterrorism

Wednesday, May 30, 2012, 6:30 AM
By Jonathan Purtle For nearly a decade, a little-discussed, perhaps ingenious plan has been in the works for the Postal Service to deliver life-saving antibiotics to homes in the event of a bioterrorist attack. Antibiotics (a.k.a. “medical countermeasures”) like ciprofloxacin and doxycycline... Read more

Why gay marriage is healthy

Monday, May 28, 2012, 6:30 AM
By Michael Yudell Kudos to CNN host Brooke Baldwin, who last week asked Tony Perkins, notorious homophobe and head of the hate-group the Family Research Council, “why do homosexuals bother you so much?” Perkins and his anti-gay and anti-gay marriage bigotry regularly appear on the news... Read more

The Barnes Foundation: a monument to prevention of gonorrhea?

Friday, May 25, 2012, 6:30 AM
By Jonathan Purtle This weekend, for 56 consecutive hours, the Barnes Foundation will open its doors to the public at its new home on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. While the merits of the foundation’s controversial move from Merion to Philadelphia may be on the minds of some museum-goers as... Read more

Should we arrest TB patients for skipping their meds?

Tuesday, May 22, 2012, 6:30 AM
By Michael Yudell Reports last week of a San Francisco area man arrested on two misdemeanor counts for not taking his tuberculosis medication is shedding light on a little-known and rarely used public health policy — the power to arrest people who may endanger the public’s health. According... Read more

Hepatitis C: A silent epidemic (you can help stop on Saturday)

Thursday, May 17, 2012, 6:30 AM
By Michael Yudell More than 3 million Americans are infected with the Hepatitis C virus, and half of them don’t even realize it? You could be one of them. Hepatitis C is a viral infection that attacks the liver, causing liver damage and sometimes liver failure or liver cancer. It is the most... Read more

The Ride of Silence: a loud cry for bicycle safety

Tuesday, May 15, 2012, 6:30 AM
By Jonathan Purtle Textbooks will tell you that statistics are the basis for most public health decisions. In reality, it’s evocative displays of remembrance, solidarity, and outrage about lives lost that really get things done. Wednesday’s Ride of Silence is one such powerful display... Read more

It's Mother's Day. Got Breast Milk?

Sunday, May 13, 2012, 6:30 AM
By Michael Yudell Almost two years ago my wife was visiting her native Boston with our second daughter, and was nursing her on a bench at a suburban mall. While sitting there, feeding our then 4-month-old child, a stranger aggressively approached her and said, “That is disgusting!” My... Read more

Diagnosing a public health problem: Photoshop

Thursday, May 10, 2012, 6:30 AM
By Jonathan Purtle Why is it that the fatter America gets, the more unrealistically thin our ideal of what people should look like becomes? It's not just a perplexing paradox. It poses a threat to the public’s health: our nation’s obesity crisis may eventually be coupled with anorexia... Read more

Can a Bud boycott help the Pine Ridge Reservation?

Tuesday, May 8, 2012, 6:30 AM
By Michael Yudell In Sunday’s New York Times, columnist Nicholas Kristof called for a boycott of Anheuser-Busch (maker of beers like Budweiser, Rolling Rock, and, for the fancier among you, Stella Artois) for its role in selling alcohol in the tiny Nebraska town of Whiteclay. According to Kristof... Read more

Losing your job may mean losing your health

Sunday, May 6, 2012, 6:30 AM
By Michael Yudell Friday’s release of April’s weak jobs data was bad news for American workers in more ways than you might suspect, and bad news, perhaps, for the reelection prospects of President Obama. Only 115,000 jobs were added last month, a decline from 154,000 in March and well... Read more
About this blog

What is public health — and why does it matter?

Through prevention, education, and intervention, public health practitioners - epidemiologists, health policy experts, municipal workers, environmental health scientists - work to keep us healthy.

It’s not always easy. Michael Yudell, Jonathan Purtle, and other contributors tell you why.

Michael Yudell, PhD, MPH Associate Professor, Drexel University School of Public Health
Jonathan Purtle, DrPH, MSc Assistant Professor, Drexel University School of Public Health
Janet Golden, PhD Professor of history, Rutgers University-Camden
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