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Archive: January, 2012

Why are the French still blaming mothers for autism?

Tuesday, January 31, 2012, 4:56 PM
The victimization of autistic children and their families in the United States by many psychoanalysts and their acolytes from the late 1940s through at least the 1970s has been well documented in memoirs on the subject and by historians and journalists (here, here, here, and here). During this time... Read more

Pennsylvania enters the modern age of HIV prevention

Friday, January 27, 2012, 6:30 AM
You may not have heard much about a Pennsylvania law that Gov. Corbett signed in July, but just about everyone will experience its impact in the privacy of their doctor’s office. Act 59, which became effective in September, amends the state’s antiquated HIV testing regulations and aligns... Read more

Why everyone is so angry at Paula Deen

Wednesday, January 25, 2012, 6:30 AM
Today’s post is by Leah Roman, a guest blogger for The Public’s Health. Roman, a project manager for the Firefighter Injury Research & Safety Trends (FIRST) project at Drexel University School of Public Health, blogs regularly about the intersection of public health and pop culture... Read more

I wonder what Siri would say about those workers' health

Monday, January 23, 2012, 6:30 AM
I wonder what Siri—the Apple iPhone’s know-it-all voice-recognition helpmate—would say if asked about worker health and safety conditions in the factory from which she was born. Recent reports about labor conditions in those factories would suggest either scared silence or outrage... Read more

Are Videos of Fat Kids the Best Way to Attack Obesity?

Thursday, January 19, 2012, 7:59 PM
Last week we wrote about health advocates in Georgia struggling with ways to stem the nation’s second-highest statewide childhood obesity rate, and the controversial ad campaign that has resulted. Nearly 40% of children in Georgia are either overweight or obese, and there’s no end in sight... Read more

Recognizing the Consequences of Childhood Stress. Are WE There Yet?

Monday, January 16, 2012, 6:30 AM
Perhaps the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) is following through on a New Year’s resolution to save the world. Two weeks ago, the AAP issued a policy statement and technical report about the harmful effects of childhood trauma, toxic stress, and adversity on health and development. This... Read more

We Are Number 1 . . . Again!

Friday, January 13, 2012, 6:30 AM
Rest easy Philadelphians with a cheesesteak in one hand and a soda in the other. Not only does our city have the awful distinction of being the poorest big city in the United States (we wrote about this back in September), we are also the fattest. A whopping 64% of adults and 57% of children 6-11 years... Read more

Fraudulent Studies Disappear, But Not Without a Sound (Thanks to 'Retraction Watch')

Wednesday, January 11, 2012, 6:30 AM
Medical journals and other peer-reviewed publications pride themselves on holding researchers to the highest standards of ethical and scientific integrity. So when it’s later discovered that data in a published study were fraudulent or that human subjects were treated in an unethical manner... Read more

Taking a Deeper Look at the Facts about Fracking

Monday, January 9, 2012, 6:30 AM
The struggle between private interests and the public’s health is not a new one. As David Michaels describes in Doubt Is Their Product, powerful industries have always invested substantial resources to hide the health risks associated with their products. It seems that the hydraulic fracturing... Read more

Should We Vaccinate Against Unhealthy Behavior? (Say, Smoking?)

Friday, January 6, 2012, 6:30 AM
Geisinger Health, the major health care system of central and northeastern Pennsylvania, recently joined Abington Memorial Hospital, the World Health Organization and other tobacco-conscience health care organizations by announcing that it will screen prospective employees for nicotine before hiring—those... Read more
About this blog

What is public health — and why does it matter?

Through prevention, education, and intervention, public health practitioners - epidemiologists, health policy experts, municipal workers, environmental health scientists - work to keep us healthy.

It’s not always easy. Michael Yudell, Jonathan Purtle, and other contributors tell you why.

Michael Yudell, PhD, MPH Associate Professor, Drexel University School of Public Health
Jonathan Purtle, DrPH, MSc Assistant Professor, Drexel University School of Public Health
Janet Golden, PhD Professor of history, Rutgers University-Camden
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