Monday, September 1, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Janet Golden

Historical antecedents to experimental Ebola treatments

Tuesday, August 19, 2014, 6:00 AM
We had the chance this week to sit down with physician and historian Scott Podolsky to discuss the history of serum therapy, the treatment for Ebola first provided to Americans Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol and now given to three health workers in Liberia. Podolsky is Associate Professor of Global... Read more

Skip baseball, watch a movie

Tuesday, August 12, 2014, 6:30 AM
The Phillies are having a dismal season (and that is the politest term I can think of for describing it). So, there’s no need to sit down at night and watch another game. Turn off the TV and turn on the computer and you can stream some films about public health. Or visit your local library and... Read more

Ebola: fears, truths, answers, and actions

Tuesday, August 5, 2014, 6:30 AM
We are getting a lot of news about the ebola virus. Yes, it is extraordinarily deadly and outbreaks can have a case fatality rate of up to 90 percent. Yes, it has now spread to another country, Nigeria, And triggered some fears-but, so far, no diagnoses-in New York. The death toll in Africa is now... Read more

Plague and quarantine: An old (and ongoing) practice

Thursday, July 24, 2014, 6:30 AM
Every July in Italy, Venice the Festa del Redentore (Feast of the Redeemer) celebrates the city’s deliverance from the plague, which killed 50,000 people – in Venice – between 1576 and 1577. (A mass grave of victims was dug up five years ago.) That two-year epidemic was one of the... Read more

Rickets returns: Whatever happened to cod liver oil?

Friday, July 18, 2014, 6:00 AM
Rickets, a disease caused by a lack of calcium and vitamin D that leads to softening of the bones and bone deformities is reportedly on the rise in the United States and elsewhere. Once the most common nutritional disease of children, Rickets caused bowlegs and other problems such as deformed pelvises... Read more

Health warnings for travelers (chikungunya, anyone?)

Tuesday, July 8, 2014, 6:30 AM
Returning to the United States last month I found some interesting public health information on the TV monitors at the United States Customs and Border Protection area at Philadelphia International Airport. There was a warning for Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), an acute viral illness found... Read more

Visiting public health history: Ellis Island

Tuesday, June 17, 2014, 6:30 AM
Twelve million people passed through the Ellis Island, New York’s immigration station between 1892 and 1954. Before entering the United States, third-class passengers underwent a visual medical inspection by officers of the United States Public Health Service. The woman in the image above is having... Read more

What is a diagnosis? A cause, not a victim.

Thursday, June 5, 2014, 6:30 AM
Viewing the HBO movie “The Normal Heart” – showing again Sunday and next Thursday and Friday – brings you vividly back to the beginning of HIV/AIDS in New York City in the early 1980s. People are struggling with a deadly illness that had no identified cause, a range of symptoms... Read more

World No Tobacco Day: A brief review

Saturday, May 31, 2014, 12:21 AM
It was a half-century ago that the U.S. Surgeon General's Report on Smoking and Health alerted Americans to the risks of smoking. You can read the entire document here. The report's history is a featured exhibit at the Lyndon Baines Johnson Presidential Library in Austin, Texas. Did you know that... Read more

Antibiotic resistance: A global threat

Wednesday, May 21, 2014, 6:30 AM
The World Health Organization last month released a detailed report warning about antimicrobial resistance as a global trend. Even the press release is scary. The modern antibiotic era began in the 1930s with the development of the first sulfa drugs, which inhibited bacterial growth, and blossomed... Read more
About this blog

What is public health — and why does it matter?

Through prevention, education, and intervention, public health practitioners - epidemiologists, health policy experts, municipal workers, environmental health scientists - work to keep us healthy.

It’s not always easy. Michael Yudell, Jonathan Purtle, and other contributors tell you why.

Michael Yudell, PhD, MPH Associate Professor, Drexel University School of Public Health
Jonathan Purtle, DrPH, MPH Research Director, Drexel Center for Nonviolence and Social Justice
Janet Golden, PhD Professor of history, Rutgers University-Camden
Also on Philly.com:
Stay Connected