Saturday, May 30, 2015

Ethics

'Asylums' vs. failed community care: a false choice for the severely mentally ill

Thursday, March 5, 2015, 6:30 AM
This is the second in a mini-series of posts–responses to a controversial essay by University of Pennsylvania bioethicists titled “Improving Long-term Psychiatric Care: Back the Asylum”–exploring the state of mental health care in America, and how to fix it. Just beyond the... Read more

Set aside 'Little Orphan Annie.' How do we really deal with unwanted kids?

Tuesday, February 3, 2015, 6:30 AM
Americans prefer stories about our most vulnerable youngsters to have a happy ending, like the comic book character “Little Orphan Annie,” so popular that she returned as a musical and was recently remade into the move “Annie” It allows us to indulge in the fantasy that plucky... Read more

Should teens get to say ‘no’ to life-saving medical treatment?

Friday, January 23, 2015, 6:30 AM
Two weeks ago, the Connecticut Supreme Court ruled in favor of a Hartford Hospital forcing chemotherapy on Cassandra C., a 17-year-old girl with Hodgkin's lymphoma, concluding that she was not a “mature minor” in the legal sense of the term and was therefore unable to refuse such life-saving... Read more

Ebola quarantines: nurses' perspective

Tuesday, November 18, 2014, 6:30 AM
The Ebola crisis in West Africa continues to rage unabated. The suffering of adults, children, and communities is unparalleled. In fact, the World Health Organization estimates that nearly 5,000 people have died, including more than 300 healthcare workers. The lack of public infrastructure, including... Read more

A century after W.E.B. Du Bois, science still gets race wrong

Friday, October 3, 2014, 6:30 AM
Most of us today don’t know the name W.E.B. Du Bois. But we should. Du Bois’s pioneering sociological work on race (books like The Philadelphia Negro and The Souls of Black Folk) and his leadership at the forefront of civil rights struggles (including a founder of the National Association... Read more

Facing the concussion risks of youth football

Friday, September 26, 2014, 6:30 AM
After years of denying the link between football and brain disease, this month the National Football League’s own experts calculated that nearly one third of its players will go on to develop long-term cognitive problems after retirement. The league’s new stance might help shift public... Read more

Can you trust open-access journals?

Friday, August 1, 2014, 6:30 AM
Just arrived in my email inbox: Dear Dr. Jonathan Purtle, Greetings!!! We solicit your valuable contribution for the Journal Family Medicine & Medical Science Research … Dear Researcher, publish in the International Journal of Medical and Applied Sciences … Decision on your paper... Read more

Smoking chocolate

Tuesday, June 24, 2014, 6:30 AM
A report released Monday (the executive summary is here) by the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids reminds us that the fight against tobacco and the companies that sell tobacco products goes on despite some successes. As if smoking wasn’t deadly enough, the report calls attention to changes to cigarettes... Read more

The link between felon disenfranchisement, politics, and health

Wednesday, June 11, 2014, 6:30 AM
Consider two things: - Life expectancy at birth for an African American male born in Philadelphia is 7.6 years shorter than a white male (67.5 years vs. 75.1). - About 13% of African American men in the United States are prohibited from voting compared to 2.5% of the general voting age... Read more

What is a diagnosis? A cause, not a victim.

Thursday, June 5, 2014, 6:30 AM
Viewing the HBO movie “The Normal Heart” – showing again Sunday and next Thursday and Friday – brings you vividly back to the beginning of HIV/AIDS in New York City in the early 1980s. People are struggling with a deadly illness that had no identified cause, a range of symptoms... Read more
About this blog

What is public health — and why does it matter?

Through prevention, education, and intervention, public health practitioners - epidemiologists, health policy experts, municipal workers, environmental health scientists - work to keep us healthy.

It’s not always easy. Michael Yudell, Jonathan Purtle, and other contributors tell you why.

Michael Yudell, PhD, MPH Associate Professor, Drexel University School of Public Health
Jonathan Purtle, DrPH, MSc Assistant Professor, Drexel University School of Public Health
Janet Golden, PhD Professor of history, Rutgers University-Camden
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