Monday, November 24, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

How is your local hospital doing? Combating hospital-acquired infections

Thursday, November 20, 2014, 5:30 AM
During the last weeks, as Americans watched health care workers don protective equipment before treating patients in West Africa with Ebola, I was donning my own protective garb—a yellow hospital gown and purple gloves—so that I could visit a friend in the hospital. She had Clostridium Difficile... Read more

Ebola quarantines: nurses' perspective

Tuesday, November 18, 2014, 6:30 AM
The Ebola crisis in West Africa continues to rage unabated. The suffering of adults, children, and communities is unparalleled. In fact, the World Health Organization estimates that nearly 5,000 people have died, including more than 300 healthcare workers. The lack of public infrastructure, including... Read more

The cure for panic: Ebola in historical perspective

Thursday, November 13, 2014, 6:00 AM
The illness itself is scary: first the sudden aches, then the spikes of fever and chills, before the massive internal bleeding and copious vomiting and diarrhea. Death comes amid delirium and hemorrhaging from the nose, mouth, and other mucous membranes. A handful of isolated cases in the United States... Read more

A bipartisan success at getting drugs to the pharmacy faster (and cheaper)

Wednesday, November 5, 2014, 6:30 AM
Most medications used to be expensive – much more expensive than they are today. As recently as the early 1980s, most important drugs on the market were brand names under patent protection. Generics were uncommon; the cost of developing and marketing them in competition with the big brands was... Read more

Hitching a ride with Ebola: opportunism

Thursday, October 30, 2014, 6:30 AM
The 1918 influenza pandemic killed 50 to 100 million people around the world. The death toll is uncertain because we do not have good figures from China, India, and other parts of Asia. One thing we do know, where some saw death, others saw opportunity. Quack remedies-to cure quickly appeared on... Read more

Preventing drug deaths in Pa.: moving forward, too slowly

Tuesday, October 28, 2014, 6:30 AM
Over the past few months the Pennsylvania legislature has taken some important steps forward in addressing the burgeoning epidemic of opioid overdoses in this state. But before we start applauding – let’s take a moment to review where we are, what the legislation will and will not do, and... Read more

Why not ban travel to stop Ebola?

Friday, October 24, 2014, 6:30 AM
Ebola is rightly frightening people worldwide because of its graphic symptoms, high mortality rates, and perceived infectivity. Over the past few weeks, as we watched one man in Dallas die from Ebola and two of his health providers battle it–with another, unrelated case identified Thursday night... Read more

Yellow fever and Ebola: similar scourges, centuries apart

Tuesday, October 21, 2014, 6:30 AM
The disease is terrifying. Many of the stricken are left in the streets to die horrible deaths, their bodies unclaimed. Thousands flee. The government appears helpless to stop the scourge from spreading. Physicians and nurses offer care, but have no effective methods of treatment or means to prevent... Read more

Syracuse University can teach us a lot about Ebola panic

Friday, October 17, 2014, 5:45 PM
Shame on Syracuse University for proving a point—that panic and bad behavior in the wake of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa threatens us as well. The Washington Post reported Friday that Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist Michel du Cille was disinvited by Syracuse to a journalism workshop... Read more

The politics of childbirth: An interview with Paula Michaels

Friday, October 10, 2014, 9:19 AM
Did you know that Lamaze, a well-known childbirth method originated in the Soviet Union? The politics of pain relief in childbirth has a fascinating history, revealed by historian Paula Michaels. What is Lamaze? Historically, the Lamaze method, also known as psychoprophylaxis, was is a way of giving... Read more
About this blog

What is public health — and why does it matter?

Through prevention, education, and intervention, public health practitioners - epidemiologists, health policy experts, municipal workers, environmental health scientists - work to keep us healthy.

It’s not always easy. Michael Yudell, Jonathan Purtle, and other contributors tell you why.

Michael Yudell, PhD, MPH Associate Professor, Drexel University School of Public Health
Jonathan Purtle, DrPH, MSc Assistant Professor, Drexel University School of Public Health
Janet Golden, PhD Professor of history, Rutgers University-Camden
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