Monday, July 14, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

U.S. Soccer accepts Philadelphia's World Cup bid proposal

The U.S. Soccer Federation whittled its list of potential World Cup cities from 38 down to 27 this afternoon, and Philadelphia made the cut.

U.S. Soccer accepts Philadelphia's World Cup bid proposal

The U.S. Soccer Federation whittled its list of potential World Cup cities from 38 down to 27 this afternoon, and Philadelphia made the cut.

Among the notable markets that did not make it were Columbus, Pittsburgh, New Orleans, Salt Lake City and Las Vegas. Salt Lake City came as a surprise to me because of Sunil Gulati's statement about wanting to have games in all four time zones. This leaves Denver as the only Mountain Time city in the bid process, though Phoenix observes Mountain Time in the winter.

It's a little bit interesting that Cleveland is the only Ohio city left, as Cincinnati also was eliminated at this stage. Cleveland is the biggest market in the state, but Columbus has the MLS team and the larger stadium.

The other eliminated markets were Cincinnati; Birmingham, Ala.; Fayetteville, Ark.; Knoxville, Tenn.; Minneapolis; and San Antonio.

I thought Minneapolis stood a chance on account of the new Vikings' stadium, which is outdoors. It's also probably a few degrees cooler there in July than it is in Birmingham.

Below is the list of cities and stadiums that made the cut in this round, in alphabetical order. You'll notice that the listed capacity of Lincoln Financial Field is 67,594. I've seen it listed as 68,532 on a number of occasions, but the stadium's official website uses the smaller number.

So it's not a reflection of what the capacity would be if seats get knocked out to install a wider playing surface.

Market
Stadium
Capacity
Atlanta, Ga. Georgia Dome 71,250
Baltimore, Md. M&T Bank Stadium 71,008
Boston, Mass. (Foxborough) Gillette Stadium 71.693
Charlotte, N.C. Bank of America Stadium 73,778
Chicago, Ill. Soldier Field 61,000
Cleveland, Ohio Cleveland Browns Stadium 72,000
Dallas, Texas Cotton Bowl 89,000
Dallas, Texas (Arlington) Cowboys Stadium 100,000
Denver, Colo. INVESCO Field at Mile High 76,125
Detroit, Mich. Ford Field 67,188
Detroit, Mich. (Ann Arbor) Michigan Stadium 100,000
Houston, Texas Reliant Stadium 71,500
Indianapolis, Ind. Lucas Oil Stadium 64,200
Jacksonville, Fla. Jacksonville Municipal Stadium 82,000
Kansas City, Mo. Arrowhead Stadium 77,000
Los Angeles, Calif. Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum 93,607
Los Angeles, Calif. (Pasadena) Rose Bowl 92,000
Miami, Fla. (Miami Gardens) Land Shark Stadium 75,540
Nashville, Tenn. LP Field 69,143
New York/N.J. (East Rutherford) New Meadowlands Stadium 82,000
Oakland, Calif. Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum 63,026
Orlando, Fla. Florida Citrus Bowl 65,616
Philadelphia, Pa. Lincoln Financial Field 67,594
Phoenix, Ariz. (Glendale) University of Phoenix Stadium 71,000
San Diego, Calif. Qualcomm Stadium 70,500
San Francisco, Calif. (Palo Alto) Stanford Stadium 50,500
Seattle, Wash. Qwest Field 67,000
Seattle, Wash. Husky Stadium 72,500
St. Louis, Mo. Edward Jones Dome 67,268
Tampa, Fla. Raymond James Stadium 65,856
Washington, D.C. RFK Stadium 45,600
Washington. D.C. (Landover, Md.) FedEx Field 91,704

Jonathan Tannenwald Philly.com
About this blog
Soft Pretzel Logic is Philly.com's college sports blog, with a primary focus on the University of Pennsylvania. You'll also see coverage of the Big 5, other major college sports events in the region, and the annual Penn Relays track and field meet.

Reach Jonathan at jtannenwald@phillynews.com or 215-854-2330.

Jonathan Tannenwald Philly.com
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