Wednesday, October 22, 2014
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"Overwhelmed" in D.C.

Inquirer staff writer Zoe Tillman reports from Washington D.C. Victor Gilchrist, 40, from Miami, walked away from the Washington Monument after the ceremony on his way to the parade. “I’m still overwhelmed,” Gilchrist said. “The speech encompassed what everyone want to hear.” Gilchrist said he was surprised at how well behaved the crowd was, considering its overwhelming size. Akrasi Siriboe, 40, an IT consultant from Georgia, but originally from Africa, was also on his way to the parade route. The native of Ghana said he was moved by Obama’s words. “I liked the peace for everybody message that we should be able to cross the short line between all races.” Click here for Philly.com's politics page.

"Overwhelmed" in D.C.


Inquirer staff writer Zoe Tillman reports from Washington D.C.


Victor Gilchrist, 40, from Miami, walked away from the Washington Monument after the ceremony on his way to the parade.

“I’m still overwhelmed,” Gilchrist said. “The speech encompassed what everyone want to hear.”

Gilchrist said he was surprised at how well behaved the crowd was, considering its overwhelming size.

Akrasi Siriboe, 40, an IT consultant from Georgia, but originally from Africa, was also on his way to the parade route. The native of Ghana said he was moved by Obama’s words.

“I liked the peace for everybody message that we should be able to cross the short line between all races.”

Click here for Philly.com's politics page.

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The Inauguration: Jan. 20 blog brings you coverage of President-elect Barack Obama's transition into office.

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Thomas FitzgeraldThomas Fitzgerald joined The Philadelphia Inquirer in 2000, and has covered Harrisburg as well as city, state and national politics for the newspaper. He was a “boy on the bus” in the 2004 presidential campaign and during primary contests in 2000 and 1996.

Nathan Gorenstein has covered politics and government in the city, state and nation for the Inquirer. He's worked in the city hall bureau, had a stint on the business desk, and once covered the suburbs. After serving as assistant regional editor, he was named editor of the "Politics" web site.

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