Friday, November 28, 2014
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Obama speech arouses memories of Kings

Inquirer staff writer Jonathan Tamari reports: Edith Savage-Jennings, an old friend of Coretta Scott King’s, said she was overcome with emotion and cried as President Obama took the oath of office and delivered his speech. “All I could think of was Martin, Coretta,” she said. “It’s hard to say how you feel. I’m just excited and I’m just so joyful.” Jennings’ Coretta Scott King Humanitarian Group hosted a viewing party in Trenton. “He left me here for this day,” said Jennings, 84. “As years go on, I may not be here much longer, but that’s alright.” Ophelia Hughley, who started her school days in segregated classes in South Carolina, said after the swearing in: “That’s my president,” before adding, “that is our president.” Click here for Philly.com's politics page.

Obama speech arouses memories of Kings

Inquirer staff writer Jonathan Tamari reports:


Edith Savage-Jennings, an old friend of Coretta Scott King’s, said she was overcome with emotion and cried as President Obama took the oath of office and delivered his speech.

“All I could think of was Martin, Coretta,” she said. “It’s hard to say how you feel. I’m just excited and I’m just so joyful.”

Jennings’ Coretta Scott King Humanitarian Group hosted a viewing party in Trenton.

“He left me here for this day,” said Jennings, 84. “As years go on, I may not be here much longer, but that’s alright.”

Ophelia Hughley, who started her school days in segregated classes in South Carolina, said after the swearing in:

“That’s my president,” before adding, “that is our president.”


Click here for Philly.com's politics page.

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The Inauguration: Jan. 20 blog brings you coverage of President-elect Barack Obama's transition into office.

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Thomas FitzgeraldThomas Fitzgerald joined The Philadelphia Inquirer in 2000, and has covered Harrisburg as well as city, state and national politics for the newspaper. He was a “boy on the bus” in the 2004 presidential campaign and during primary contests in 2000 and 1996.

Nathan Gorenstein has covered politics and government in the city, state and nation for the Inquirer. He's worked in the city hall bureau, had a stint on the business desk, and once covered the suburbs. After serving as assistant regional editor, he was named editor of the "Politics" web site.

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