Monday, December 29, 2014

Obama at Great Valley High School

A boisterous crowd of 1,500 attends the first-ever appearance of a presidential candidate at the 40-year-old Great Valley High School near Malvern.

Obama at Great Valley High School

 

Tom Infield reports:

1:22 p.m.
 
As he begins to wrap up a question-and-answer session, Obama is asked what he would do for the image of the U.S. in the world. That gets him into a discussion of the relationship between improving the American economy and ensuring its military security in the future. 
 
"There's never been a nation on earth that saw its economy decline and continue to be the most powerful military power on earth. That has never happened...if our economy declines, then over time out military power will decline, too."
 
Big applause as he ends, after almost 55 minutes.

1:05 p.m.

Obama has spent a lot of time talking of the need to do more -- billions of dollars more -- for public education.
 
But he also told this audience of students and educators: "You can't just blame the schools for underfunding. Parents also have to parent. You've got to turn off the television set sometimes in that house and put away the video game, and young people have to instill in themselves the sense of excellence."
 
12:52 p.m.

The students get to hear Obama's basic stump speech: 

"We believe in the fundamental idea that has always been at the heart of this nation's progress -- that I am my brother's keeper. We know that (government) can't solve all our problems; We don't want it to...we understand that we cant stop every job from going overseas...but That's not an excuse to spend another 40 years to see our government do nothing to reclaim the American dream."
 
12:27 p.m.:
 
The candidate arrives.
 
A deafening roar echoes off the cinder-block walls of the gym. Obama, in a gray suit and muted blue tie, works the rope line, shaking hands.
 
The crowd chants: "Barack Obama! Barack Obama!"
 
After a brief introduction, Obama steps to the podium.
 
He starts slowly but builds.
 
"Far too many working people are struggling to achieve the opportunity that should be America's birthright," he says. "We all know that all of the significant signs  are pointing to a recession...."
 

 

12:15 p.m...Where's Obama? The crowd's still excited, but the tedium of waiting is starting to tell. He was due at 11:30.

11:40 a.m.....Billed as an economic town hall, this event was open to anyone who stopped by a shop in Phoenixville yesterday to pick them up -- until they ran out, of course. The students who got in were winners of an in-school lottery. To apply, a student had to be old enough to vote by November.

11:15 a.m.

A boisterous crowd of 1,500 is awaiting the first-ever appearance of a presidential candidate at the 40-year-old Great Valley High School near Malvern.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10:15 a.m.

A boisterous crowd of 1,500 is awaiting the first-ever appearance of a presidential candidate at the 40-year-old Great Valley High School near Malvern.

The crowd appeared pretty pumped from the git-go -- but then 300 students from the school entered a section of bleachers in the school gym. The students clapped, stomped, cheered, did the wave -- and that was before the arrival of the star attraction -- Sen. Barack Obama.

 

 

 

About this blog

The Inauguration: Jan. 20 blog brings you coverage of President-elect Barack Obama's transition into office.

It's written by political journalists from the Philadelphia Inquirer. Send us your comments -- and news tips -- at this address.

Thomas FitzgeraldThomas Fitzgerald joined The Philadelphia Inquirer in 2000, and has covered Harrisburg as well as city, state and national politics for the newspaper. He was a “boy on the bus” in the 2004 presidential campaign and during primary contests in 2000 and 1996.

Nathan Gorenstein has covered politics and government in the city, state and nation for the Inquirer. He's worked in the city hall bureau, had a stint on the business desk, and once covered the suburbs. After serving as assistant regional editor, he was named editor of the "Politics" web site.

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