Saturday, July 12, 2014
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Museumgoers watch Obama's speech

Inquirer staff writer Bonnie L. Cook reports: The group gathered around the TV in the foyer of the Mercer Museum in Doylestown watched quietly and solemnly as the new president gave his inaugural address. When Obama said said that the challenges are great, but “they will be met,” museum volunteer Richard Duvall, 68, said, “Very strong speech.” At the end of the address, Duvall, a resident of Doylestown Township, commented, “His voice got stronger and stronger, and his words were fantastic. He’s got a plan, and I think he’s going to run with it.” Another watcher, Gayle Shupack, 38, marketing public relations coordinator for the museum, interjected, “But can he follow through?” Asked if the speech had inspired her, Shupack replied, “Yes, he’s a great speaker.” But she still had concerns. “I listen to a lot of talk radio, and I worry: is he even going to be given a chance? Conservatives are already griping at the cost of the inauguration.” Molly Lowell, 68, executive vice-president of the Bucks County Historical Society, responded: “He can’t do it alone. Everyone has a responsibility to put all the pettiness aside for reform at all levels of government.” Lowell described Obama’s speech as “very thoughtful. He covered a lot of ground. He really spoke to everyone. Everyone has to take responsibility to better the country.”

Museumgoers watch Obama's speech

Inquirer staff writer Bonnie L. Cook reports:

The group gathered around the TV in the foyer of the Mercer Museum in Doylestown watched quietly and solemnly as the new president gave his inaugural address.

When Obama said said that the challenges are great, but “they will be met,” museum volunteer Richard Duvall, 68, said, “Very strong speech.”

At the end of the address, Duvall, a resident of Doylestown Township, commented, “His voice got stronger and stronger, and his words were fantastic. He’s got a plan, and I think he’s going to run with it.”

Another watcher, Gayle Shupack, 38, marketing public relations coordinator for the museum, interjected,  “But can he follow through?”

Asked if the speech had inspired her, Shupack replied, “Yes, he’s a great speaker.” But she still had concerns. “I listen to a lot of talk radio, and I worry: is he even going to be given a chance? Conservatives are already griping at the cost of the inauguration.”

Molly Lowell, 68, executive vice-president of the Bucks County Historical Society, responded: “He can’t do it alone. Everyone has a responsibility to put all the pettiness aside for reform at all levels of government.”

Lowell described Obama’s speech as “very thoughtful. He covered a lot of ground. He really spoke to everyone. Everyone has to take responsibility to better the country.”

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The Inauguration: Jan. 20 blog brings you coverage of President-elect Barack Obama's transition into office.

It's written by political journalists from the Philadelphia Inquirer. Send us your comments -- and news tips -- at this address.

Thomas FitzgeraldThomas Fitzgerald joined The Philadelphia Inquirer in 2000, and has covered Harrisburg as well as city, state and national politics for the newspaper. He was a “boy on the bus” in the 2004 presidential campaign and during primary contests in 2000 and 1996.

Nathan Gorenstein has covered politics and government in the city, state and nation for the Inquirer. He's worked in the city hall bureau, had a stint on the business desk, and once covered the suburbs. After serving as assistant regional editor, he was named editor of the "Politics" web site.

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