Friday, November 28, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Jersey bus passengers still on a bus

Inquirer staff writer Allison Steele reports: 10:19 a.m. The buses from RFK stadium to downtown are packed, and buzzing with excitement. People are crammed shoulder to shoulder, and everyone is talking about nothing but the inauguration. Gloria Anderson, 51, of Kennett Square, Pa., had been impatient waiting for the shuttle bus. She was so worried about missing the ceremony that she was considering walking to the mall from the stadium. "Go ahead mom, you walk," joked her son, 33-year-old Aaron Bowers, pulling his scarf over his face against the bitter wind. "I'll be here." Eventually, they made their way onto a bus. Moments later, as the bus hit gridlocked traffic outside of the city, she began worrying anew. Click here for Philly.com's politics page.

Jersey bus passengers still on a bus


Inquirer staff writer Allison Steele reports:

10:19 a.m.

The buses from RFK stadium to downtown are packed, and buzzing with excitement. People are crammed shoulder to shoulder, and everyone is talking about nothing but the inauguration.

Gloria Anderson, 51, of Kennett Square, Pa., had been impatient waiting for the shuttle bus. She was so worried about missing the ceremony that she was considering walking to the mall from the stadium.

"Go ahead mom, you walk," joked her son, 33-year-old Aaron Bowers, pulling his scarf over his face against the bitter wind. "I'll be here."

Eventually, they made their way onto a bus. Moments later, as the bus hit gridlocked traffic outside of the city, she began worrying anew.

Click here for Philly.com's politics page.

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The Inauguration: Jan. 20 blog brings you coverage of President-elect Barack Obama's transition into office.

It's written by political journalists from the Philadelphia Inquirer. Send us your comments -- and news tips -- at this address.

Thomas FitzgeraldThomas Fitzgerald joined The Philadelphia Inquirer in 2000, and has covered Harrisburg as well as city, state and national politics for the newspaper. He was a “boy on the bus” in the 2004 presidential campaign and during primary contests in 2000 and 1996.

Nathan Gorenstein has covered politics and government in the city, state and nation for the Inquirer. He's worked in the city hall bureau, had a stint on the business desk, and once covered the suburbs. After serving as assistant regional editor, he was named editor of the "Politics" web site.

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