Thursday, August 28, 2014
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In the Roundhouse, more witnesses to history

Inquirer staff writer Barbara Boyer reports: At police headquarters in Center City, about a dozen people watched a television propped on a plastic crate in the lobby to watch the inauguration. “History,” said Ron Plummer, a businessman from Princeton, N.J., who was in the building for a meeting that ended shortly before President-elect Obama took the oath of office. “Here we go.” Officer Andrea Smith said the speech was “inspiring” with a tone that would unite the nation. “I think he put forth what people should do -- to become one instead of separate,” Smith said. “I think he gives people a sense of hope, something to look forward to.”

In the Roundhouse, more witnesses to history

Inquirer staff writer Barbara Boyer reports:

At police headquarters in Center City, about a dozen people watched a television propped on a plastic crate in the lobby to watch the inauguration.

“History,” said Ron Plummer, a businessman from Princeton, N.J., who was in the building for a meeting that ended shortly before President-elect Obama took the oath of office. “Here we go.”

Officer Andrea Smith said the speech was “inspiring” with a tone that would unite the nation.

“I think he put forth what people should do -- to become one instead of separate,” Smith said. “I think he gives people a sense of hope, something to look forward to.”

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About this blog

The Inauguration: Jan. 20 blog brings you coverage of President-elect Barack Obama's transition into office.

It's written by political journalists from the Philadelphia Inquirer. Send us your comments -- and news tips -- at this address.

Thomas FitzgeraldThomas Fitzgerald joined The Philadelphia Inquirer in 2000, and has covered Harrisburg as well as city, state and national politics for the newspaper. He was a “boy on the bus” in the 2004 presidential campaign and during primary contests in 2000 and 1996.

Nathan Gorenstein has covered politics and government in the city, state and nation for the Inquirer. He's worked in the city hall bureau, had a stint on the business desk, and once covered the suburbs. After serving as assistant regional editor, he was named editor of the "Politics" web site.

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