Wednesday, August 20, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Hillary on Iran and Nukes

Joelle Farrell reports:

2:20 p.m.

One reporter asked if Clinton worried that women who support her may break with the Democratic Party if she doesn't win the nom

Hillary on Iran and Nukes

Joelle Farrell reports:

2:20 p.m.

One reporter asked if Clinton worried that women who support her may break with the Democratic Party if she doesn't win the nomination. Some independent women may feel Obama "jumped the line," that it was Clinton's turn, and they'd rather vote for Republican Sen. John McCain than vote for Obama.
 
"Whatever differences Sen. Obama and I have, and we do have them, . . . that pales in comparison to the differences we have with Sen. McCain," she said. "I think anyone who supported either Barack or me would be very foolish to think that voting for Sen. McCain made any sense."
 
Clinton, who has fashioned herself as a tough and resilient, revisited the topic of Iran a day after she confirmed that she would be willing to use nuclear weapons against that nation.
 
"If Iran were to obtain nuclear weapons and if Iran were to attack Israel with a nuclear weapon, we  would retaliate," she said. "And I want Iran to know number one that it is not in their interest to obtain nuclear weapons, number two, we will work to deter them from using such weapons by making it clear that there would be a very high price to pay."
 
Asked why she was now willing to talk about hypothetical scenarios she had avoided discussing in previous debates, Clinton said, "I think in this particular instance with Iran, it's a question not of what might be on or off the table, concerning a tactical or strategic decision, but an effort on my part to get back to what worked during the Cold War, which was deterrance."
 
"Iran is feeling quite powerful, they have been empowered by the actions fo the last seven years, and they must know that there are lines that the world will not let them cross," she added.
 
About this blog

The Inauguration: Jan. 20 blog brings you coverage of President-elect Barack Obama's transition into office.

It's written by political journalists from the Philadelphia Inquirer. Send us your comments -- and news tips -- at this address.

Thomas FitzgeraldThomas Fitzgerald joined The Philadelphia Inquirer in 2000, and has covered Harrisburg as well as city, state and national politics for the newspaper. He was a “boy on the bus” in the 2004 presidential campaign and during primary contests in 2000 and 1996.

Nathan Gorenstein has covered politics and government in the city, state and nation for the Inquirer. He's worked in the city hall bureau, had a stint on the business desk, and once covered the suburbs. After serving as assistant regional editor, he was named editor of the "Politics" web site.

Inquirer political writers
Also on Philly.com
Stay Connected