Thursday, July 31, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Havertown: Friends of opposite parties catch up on Election Day

Kathy Boccella reports: 7:25 a.m. Forty people lined up outside the Brookline Fire Company at 7 a.m. including longtime friends Janet Chrzan, 44, a Democratic ward leader and Rona Schwartz, 51, a former Republican committeewoman. “We’ve never seen anything like this before,” Chrzan said of the crowd. “This is fantastic.” The two don’t let their political differences come between them. “We both respect each other’s opinions,” said Schwartz. “It’s okay to differ.” Added Chrzan: “I look forward to the election every year so I can catch up with Rona.” In fact, the two made plans to have lunch next week. Will they discuss the election? Not likely. While Chrzan is voting for Obama, Schwartz won’t divulge who she is voting for. “I don’t like to talk politics,” she said.

Havertown: Friends of opposite parties catch up on Election Day

Kathy Boccella reports:

7:25 a.m.

Forty people lined up outside the Brookline Fire Company at 7 a.m. including longtime friends Janet Chrzan, 44, a Democratic ward leader and Rona Schwartz, 51, a former Republican committeewoman. “We’ve never seen anything like this before,” Chrzan said of the crowd. “This is fantastic.”

The two don’t let their political differences come between them. “We both respect each other’s opinions,” said Schwartz. “It’s okay to differ.”

Added Chrzan: “I look forward to the election every year so I can catch up with Rona.”

In fact, the two made plans to have lunch next week. Will they discuss the election?

Not likely. While Chrzan is voting for Obama, Schwartz won’t divulge who she is voting for. “I don’t like to talk politics,” she said.

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Thomas FitzgeraldThomas Fitzgerald joined The Philadelphia Inquirer in 2000, and has covered Harrisburg as well as city, state and national politics for the newspaper. He was a “boy on the bus” in the 2004 presidential campaign and during primary contests in 2000 and 1996.

Nathan Gorenstein has covered politics and government in the city, state and nation for the Inquirer. He's worked in the city hall bureau, had a stint on the business desk, and once covered the suburbs. After serving as assistant regional editor, he was named editor of the "Politics" web site.

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