Monday, July 14, 2014
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Far-right, near-left complain about Obama

The liberal left in the Democratic Party is worried that Obama isn't liberal enough. While the far, far GOP right is still contending Obama isn't an American citizen, hence he can't really be president. (Do they really want to go through another presidential election!) Here's the latest, courtesy of Politico. Just Monday the Supreme Court rejected one legal challenge to Obama's citizenship: "The Supreme Court Monday rejected one case contending that Obama is not a "natural born citizen," as the president is required to be under Article II, Section 1 of the U.S. Constitution. The case, referred to the court by Justice Clarence Thomas after Justice David Souter had rejected it, argued that because Obama's father was a citizen of Kenya, at the time a British colony, the president-elect was born with dual citizenship. Another case, filed by Attorney Phillip J. Berg, effectively contends that Obama has outright lied about having been born on American soil. The high court has yet to rule on that argument." Meanwhile, the Democratic near-left is worried that Obama is reneging on his pledges to eliminate the Bush tax cuts and tax the oil companies "windfall" profits. "Obama has reversed pledges to immediately repeal tax cuts for the wealthy and take on Big Oil. He’s hedged his call for a quick drawdown in Iraq. And he’s stocking his White House with anything but stalwarts of the left. Now some are shedding a reluctance to puncture the liberal euphoria at being rid of President George W. Bush to say, in effect, that the new boss looks like the old boss." Click here for Philly.com's politics page.

Far-right, near-left complain about Obama


The liberal left in the Democratic Party is worried that Obama isn't liberal enough. While the far, far GOP right is still contending Obama isn't an American citizen, hence he can't really be president. (Do they really want to go through another presidential election!) Here's the latest, courtesy of Politico.

Just Monday the Supreme Court rejected one legal challenge to Obama's citizenship:

"The Supreme Court Monday rejected one case contending that Obama is not a "natural born citizen," as the president is required to be under Article II, Section 1 of the U.S. Constitution. The case, referred to the court by Justice Clarence Thomas after Justice David Souter had rejected it, argued that because Obama's father was a citizen of Kenya, at the time a British colony, the president-elect was born with dual citizenship.

Another case, filed by Attorney Phillip J. Berg, effectively contends that Obama has outright lied about having been born on American soil. The high court has yet to rule on that argument."

Meanwhile, the Democratic near-left is worried that Obama is reneging on his pledges to eliminate the Bush tax cuts and tax the oil companies "windfall" profits.

 "Obama has reversed pledges to immediately repeal tax cuts for the wealthy and take on Big Oil. He’s hedged his call for a quick drawdown in Iraq. And he’s stocking his White House with anything but stalwarts of the left.

Now some are shedding a reluctance to puncture the liberal euphoria at being rid of President George W. Bush to say, in effect, that the new boss looks like the old boss."


Click here for Philly.com's politics page.

About this blog

The Inauguration: Jan. 20 blog brings you coverage of President-elect Barack Obama's transition into office.

It's written by political journalists from the Philadelphia Inquirer. Send us your comments -- and news tips -- at this address.

Thomas FitzgeraldThomas Fitzgerald joined The Philadelphia Inquirer in 2000, and has covered Harrisburg as well as city, state and national politics for the newspaper. He was a “boy on the bus” in the 2004 presidential campaign and during primary contests in 2000 and 1996.

Nathan Gorenstein has covered politics and government in the city, state and nation for the Inquirer. He's worked in the city hall bureau, had a stint on the business desk, and once covered the suburbs. After serving as assistant regional editor, he was named editor of the "Politics" web site.

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