Tuesday, September 23, 2014
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At Rowan University: A professor and her student

In the in the usually jammed student center on campus it is very, very quiet. Classes have been cancelled because of the election.

At Rowan University: A professor and her student

George Anastasia reports:

8:30 a.m.

In the in the usually jammed student center on campus it is very, very quiet. Classes have been cancelled because of the election.

Sitting at one table are two women - Jhanny Deltus, a 20-year-old sophomore from Asbury Park, and Diane Trace, 40, an adjunct professor of economics. Spread over the table were textbooks and notebooks as Deltus prepped for a Thursday exam.

Deltus, a first-time voter, said, “It’s exciting. It’s important because it’s the first time we’ve had an African-American. I voted for Obama, I like what he brings to the table.”

Deltus paused and smiled. “Actually, seeing a black man be president was the main reason I voted for him.”

Trace, sipping her coffee, said: “I think it’s a very significant election. There’s a big difference between the candidates.”

Trace, a resident of Malaga, said she voted before coming to work.

“I voted for McCain. I wasn’t a strong McCain supporter but the Democratic ticket seemed to lean too far to the left.”

Trace laughed and added: “I like a free market economy.”

She said she’ll be up all night watching the results. “Election Day is like my Super Bowl. Even if my team goes down, I’ll be watching.”

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Thomas FitzgeraldThomas Fitzgerald joined The Philadelphia Inquirer in 2000, and has covered Harrisburg as well as city, state and national politics for the newspaper. He was a “boy on the bus” in the 2004 presidential campaign and during primary contests in 2000 and 1996.

Nathan Gorenstein has covered politics and government in the city, state and nation for the Inquirer. He's worked in the city hall bureau, had a stint on the business desk, and once covered the suburbs. After serving as assistant regional editor, he was named editor of the "Politics" web site.

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