Friday, July 25, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

After-work voting quick in Mt. Laurel, NJ

Voters who arrived to cast ballots at Larchmont School in Mount Laurel around 5:30 p.m. were surprised to find that there were no lines. Several polling places in town were jammed early this morning, so people expected delays.

After-work voting quick in Mt. Laurel, NJ

Mike Vitez reports:

Voters who arrived to cast ballots at Larchmont School in Mount Laurel around 5:30 p.m. were surprised to find that there were no lines. Several polling places in town were jammed early this morning, so people expected delays.

Instead, they breezed in and out.

Mike O’Toole was talking on his cell phone as he walked into the precinct.

“I’m going to vote to make your life easier,” he said, speaking to his six-year-old daughter.

“Are you voting for McCain?” the little girl asked.

“I don’t think so, he replied.

“I have nothing against McCain,” he later told a reporter. “But I think it’s going to be the same thing, and we can’t have another eight years like we’ve just had.

Also in line to vote was Kristen Henry, who teaches eighth-grade science in Columbus, Burlington County. She said the election loomed large in her classroom today.

“We were misty-eyed when we did the pledge of allegiance at school,” said Henry. “Everyone was so committed and excited - [on] both sides. It was such an emotional day.”

The school where she teaches draws many students from nearby McGuire Air Force base. For military families in particular, she said, the election made for am important day.

Henry, 32, voted for Obama.

“In my liftime, this is the biggest deal I’ve seen” when it comes to presidential elections.

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Thomas FitzgeraldThomas Fitzgerald joined The Philadelphia Inquirer in 2000, and has covered Harrisburg as well as city, state and national politics for the newspaper. He was a “boy on the bus” in the 2004 presidential campaign and during primary contests in 2000 and 1996.

Nathan Gorenstein has covered politics and government in the city, state and nation for the Inquirer. He's worked in the city hall bureau, had a stint on the business desk, and once covered the suburbs. After serving as assistant regional editor, he was named editor of the "Politics" web site.

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