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Inquirer Daily News

Archive: February, 2013

POSTED: Thursday, February 28, 2013, 8:32 PM
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By Merilyn Jackson

Two duets dominate the three-piece Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane program that opened Thursday for a weekend run at the Painted Bride. Duet x 2 (1982) began the evening; Blauvelt Mountain closed it. Jones recently combined these works, along with a few others, under the title Body Against Body and presented them at the company's home, New York Live Arts (formerly Dance Theater Workshop). They look as groundbreaking and timeless as they did at their world premieres three decades ago.

Jones' huge following knows that his lover and choreographic partner, Arnie Zane, died of AIDS in 1988. The two co-choreographed the two other pieces, but Duet x 2 is solely Jones' work. In it, after rocketing out of a set of swinging doors, Antonio Brown and LaMichael Leonard Jr. abruptly halt and pace about. Soon they shuffle, soft-shoe, and spar with each other until they slam back out through the doors. Leonard returns, this time with the buttery-limbed Talli Jackson; they repeat many of the bruisingly strenuous phrases, but it seems more and more manipulative - as it goes with relationships.

Merilyn Jackson @ 8:32 PM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Wednesday, February 27, 2013, 1:08 PM

By Toby Zinman

For the Inquirer 

It’s like going to a great party with lots of Champagne: Priscilla Queen of the Desert The Musical is so much fun, so spectacular to look at, with so many danceable songs, that we all just bounced out of the Academy of Music on Tuesday night. 

Toby Zinman @ 1:08 PM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Wednesday, February 27, 2013, 4:31 PM

By Toby Zinman

For the Inquirer 

Edie Falco is the big draw for The Madrid, a play by a little-known author who also happens to be a producer on Nurse Jackie, an enormously popular TV series starring Emmy-winning Falco in the title role.  Falco’s fame was firmly established as Carmen Soprano in The Sopranos, for which she won three Emmys, two Golden Globes and two SAG awards. The Madrid has none of the magnetic characters or the quotable dialogue of either of those shows. 

Toby Zinman @ 4:31 PM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Friday, February 22, 2013, 9:20 PM

By Toby Zinman

FOR THE INQUIRER

It’s like watching a novel: all the intimacy, all the language, all the complexity of character, without having to turn a page. Nicholas Wright’s engrossing, prize-winning play about the young van Gogh, Vincent in Brixton, is receiving a just-about-perfect production at the Walnut’s Independence Studio under Kate Galvin’s direction.

Toby Zinman @ 9:20 PM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Monday, February 18, 2013, 12:43 PM

By Wendy Rosenfield

For the Inquirer

All season I’ve been mourning Philadelphia’s loss of the Barrymore Awards and their formal recognition of this region’s theatrical excellence. So in their memory (and this production’s delusional spirit), I nominate Quintessence Theatre Group’s The Diary of a Madman, an adaptation of Nikolai Gogol’s satirical short story, in whatever categories it would have qualified: best actor, director, production, music, actress. Whatever.

Wendy Rosenfield @ 12:43 PM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Sunday, February 17, 2013, 9:12 AM

The North Plan

By Toby Zinman

For the Inquirer

Toby Zinman @ 9:12 AM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Friday, February 15, 2013, 10:58 PM

 

By Toby Zinman

For the Inquirer

Toby Zinman @ 10:58 PM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Monday, February 11, 2013, 1:43 PM

By Wendy Rosenfield

for the Inquirer

Theresa Rebeck’s 90-minute monologue Bad Dates begins with an introduction to one woman’s array of shoes and clothes: classy, earthy, trashy, cute, dangerous, dowdy. If that’s enough description to turn you away from Montgomery Theater’s textured production and Sarah Sanford’s equally complex performance as single mom/restauranteur Haley Walker, perhaps you could benefit most from Haley’s excursion into the land of deceptive first impressions.

Wendy Rosenfield @ 1:43 PM  Permalink | 0 comments
About this blog
Toby Zinman's night job since 2006 is theater critic for the Inquirer. She also is a contributing writer for Variety and American Theatre magazine. Her day job: Prize-winning prof at UArts, author of four books about four playwrights (Rabe, McNally, Miller, Albee), and doer of scholarly deeds (winner of five NEH grants, Fulbright lecturer at Tel Aviv University, visiting professor in China). Her 'weekend' job as a travel writer provides adventure: dogsledding in the Yukon, ziplining in Belize, walking coast-to-coast across England, and cowboying in the Australian Outback.


Wendy Rosenfield has written freelance features and theater reviews for The Inquirer since 2006. She was theater critic for the Philadelphia Weekly from 1995 to 2001, after which she enjoyed a five-year baby-raising sabbatical. She serves on the board of the American Theatre Critics Association, was a participant in the Bennington Writer's Workshop, a 2008 NEA/USC Fellow in Theater and Musical Theater, and twice was guest critic for the Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival's Region II National Critics Institute. She received her B.A. from Bennington College and her M.L.A. from the University of Pennsylvania. She also is a fiction writer, was proofreader to a swami, publications editor for the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, and spends all her free time working out and driving people places. Follow her on Twitter @WendyRosenfield.


Jim Rutter has reviewed theater for The Inquirer since September, 2011. Since 2006, he covered dance, theater and opera for the Broad Street Review, and has also written for many suburban newspapers, including The Main Line Times. In 2009, the National Endowment for the Arts awarded him a Fellowship in Arts Journalism. Thames & Hudson released his updated and revised version of Ballet and Modern Dance in June, 2012. From 1998 to 2005, he taught philosophy and logic at Drexel, and then Widener University. He also coaches Olympic Weightlifting for Liberty Barbell, and has competed at the national level in that sport since 2001.


Merilyn Jackson regularly writes on dance for The Inquirer and other publications. She specializes in the arts, literature, food, travel, and Eastern European culture and politics. In 2001, she was dance critic in residence at the Festival of Contemporary Dance in Bytom, Poland; in 2005, she received an NEA Critics’ Fellowship to Duke University’s Institute for Dance Criticism. She likes to say that dance was her first love but that when she discovered writing she began to cheat on dance. Now that she writes about dance, she’s made an honest woman of herself, although she also writes poetry.

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