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Inquirer Daily News

Archive: October, 2012

POSTED: Sunday, October 14, 2012, 11:58 AM

By Jim Rutter

FOR THE INQUIRER

Women in Shakespeare’s day weren’t allowed to perform on stage. In Quintessence’s production of the Bard’s Othello, director Alexander Burns won’t let them play either.

@ 11:58 AM  Permalink | 0
POSTED: Friday, October 12, 2012, 11:08 PM

By Toby Zinman

For the Inquirer

Seventy scenes. Three hundred lighting cues. Ninety minutes. Four terrific actors.

Toby Zinman @ 11:08 PM  Permalink | 0
POSTED: Monday, October 8, 2012, 9:20 AM
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From L to R: Kate Brennan, Melanie Julian, Maria Konstantinidis, Colleen Hughes and Amanda Schoonover in EgoPo's "The Assassination of Jesse James"

By Jim Rutter

FOR THE INQUIRER

Director Brenna Geffers showed a bit of boldness when casting only women in EgoPo’s The Assassination of Jesse James. Running into traffic is also bold, though not without consequence.

@ 9:20 AM  Permalink | 0
POSTED: Monday, October 8, 2012, 4:09 PM
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Russ Widdall as Robert F. Kennedy in New City Stage Company's production of "RFK."

By Howard Shapiro
INQUIRER STAFF WRITER

The history play RFK, which opened Saturday in Center City, is special in several ways. It has a rare quality for a one-person play because it operates through two acts that feel genuine, not like the usual forced conversation with unearned extremes. RFK also puts us easily into another era — and in this production, with time-machine force.

And it’s exceptionally performed, by Russ Widdall, the co-artistic director of New City Stage Company, the play’s producer. Widdall does not look like Robert F. Kennedy, the man he inhabits for two hours, but he sounds and moves like him — or at least like the general memory of him, which for an audience is as good as the real thing.

howard shapiro @ 4:09 PM  Permalink | 0
POSTED: Saturday, October 6, 2012, 6:56 PM
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Chance Dean (left), Maryruth Stine and Dave Polgar in "Sherlock Holmes and the Crucifer of Blood" at Hedgerow Theatre.

By Howard Shapiro
INQUIRER STAFF WRITER

From: Mr. Sherlock Holmes
To: Dr. Watson

I say, my dear Watson, we can make immediate deductions from our visit to Sherlock Holmes and the Crucifer of Blood at the indubitably pleasant Hedgerow Theatre in Rose Valley — you know, just down the lane from the county town they call Media.

howard shapiro @ 6:56 PM  Permalink | 0
POSTED: Saturday, October 6, 2012, 6:11 PM

By Howard Shapiro
INQUIRER STAFF WRITER

It was only two hours until Wednesday night’s presidential-race debate, and another political debate was just beginning on the stage at Plays & Players Theatre, where the six cast members of This Is the Week That Is had declared themselves undecided voters, and set out to explore the issues.

And what an exploration it is! I’ve seen many versions of 1812 Productions’ annual This Is the Week That Is, a satire on news and life in general, and this year’s “Election Special” is the funniest and meatiest I can recall. It brings much needed balance to this election year — two-plus hours of laughter, and I mean some big ones, skewering the race for the White House.

howard shapiro @ 6:11 PM  Permalink | 0
POSTED: Friday, October 5, 2012, 12:53 PM

By Wendy Rosenfield

FOR THE INQUIRER

The title of Scottish playwright David Harrower’s A Slow Air refers to a type of free-form bagpipe melody, but it also describes this drama’s narrative. In Inis Nua’s production, an adult brother and sister, Morna (Emma Gibson) and Athol (Brian McCann), alternate monologues, riffing individually on the circumstances that led to their 14-year estrangement. 

Wendy Rosenfield @ 12:53 PM  Permalink | 0
POSTED: Friday, October 5, 2012, 11:23 PM

 

By Toby Zinman

For the Inquirer

Toby Zinman @ 11:23 PM  Permalink | 0
About this blog
Toby Zinman's night job since 2006 is theater critic for the Inquirer. She also is a contributing writer for Variety and American Theatre magazine. Her day job: Prize-winning prof at UArts, author of four books about four playwrights (Rabe, McNally, Miller, Albee), and doer of scholarly deeds (winner of five NEH grants, Fulbright lecturer at Tel Aviv University, visiting professor in China). Her 'weekend' job as a travel writer provides adventure: dogsledding in the Yukon, ziplining in Belize, walking coast-to-coast across England, and cowboying in the Australian Outback.


Wendy Rosenfield has written freelance features and theater reviews for The Inquirer since 2006. She was theater critic for the Philadelphia Weekly from 1995 to 2001, after which she enjoyed a five-year baby-raising sabbatical. She serves on the board of the American Theatre Critics Association, was a participant in the Bennington Writer's Workshop, a 2008 NEA/USC Fellow in Theater and Musical Theater, and twice was guest critic for the Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival's Region II National Critics Institute. She received her B.A. from Bennington College and her M.L.A. from the University of Pennsylvania. She also is a fiction writer, was proofreader to a swami, publications editor for the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, and spends all her free time working out and driving people places. Follow her on Twitter @WendyRosenfield.


Jim Rutter has reviewed theater for The Inquirer since September, 2011. Since 2006, he covered dance, theater and opera for the Broad Street Review, and has also written for many suburban newspapers, including The Main Line Times. In 2009, the National Endowment for the Arts awarded him a Fellowship in Arts Journalism. Thames & Hudson released his updated and revised version of Ballet and Modern Dance in June, 2012. From 1998 to 2005, he taught philosophy and logic at Drexel, and then Widener University. He also coaches Olympic Weightlifting for Liberty Barbell, and has competed at the national level in that sport since 2001.


Merilyn Jackson regularly writes on dance for The Inquirer and other publications. She specializes in the arts, literature, food, travel, and Eastern European culture and politics. In 2001, she was dance critic in residence at the Festival of Contemporary Dance in Bytom, Poland; in 2005, she received an NEA Critics’ Fellowship to Duke University’s Institute for Dance Criticism. She likes to say that dance was her first love but that when she discovered writing she began to cheat on dance. Now that she writes about dance, she’s made an honest woman of herself, although she also writes poetry.

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