Wednesday, May 27, 2015

POSTED: Tuesday, February 10, 2015, 1:39 PM

By Wendy Rosenfield

for the Inquirer

If there’s one thing Montgomery Theater loves, it’s a cluttered urban apartment filled with two or three of the city’s ragged loveless. Jim Geoghan’s Light Sensitive fits this bill, and like many of the theater’s other productions, it’s a story with working class humor, heart and a warm Christmas message. So, good for them. It’s not all they do, but they have their niche and they fill it well.

Wendy Rosenfield @ 1:39 PM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Sunday, February 8, 2015, 8:06 PM

By Wendy Rosenfield

for the Inquirer

Since the 1969 premiere of Steven Berkoff’s adaptation of The Metamorphosis, Gregor Samsa--you know, he woke from troubled dreams, found himself transformed in his bed--has had some impressive interpreters. Tim Roth, Roman Polanski, Mikhail Baryshnikov, all scuttled the stage as the unfortunate traveling salesman in Franz Kafka’s novella. Mt. Airy’s Quintessence Theatre Group sends Gregor through yet another transformation: this time, he is played by Kristen Bailey, a woman.

Wendy Rosenfield @ 8:06 PM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Friday, February 6, 2015, 10:47 PM

By Toby Zinman

For the Inquirer

 Inis Nua's American premiere of a play by Scotland's David Leddy, is likely to give you an attack of meta-dread. Oh-so-faux, Long Live the Little Knife  is a confused and confusing comment on theater as scam: "a life dedicated to the artistry of the swindle." (Leddy apparently thinks he's the first to notice the old illusion-vs-reality conundrum.)  This show takes a lot of patience to sit through, even though its running time is just over an hour.

Toby Zinman @ 10:47 PM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Wednesday, February 4, 2015, 10:47 PM

By Toby Zinman

For the Inquirer

Toby Zinman @ 10:47 PM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Monday, February 2, 2015, 9:24 AM

By Wendy Rosenfield

for the Inquirer

There are few true American heroes whose reputations haven’t tarnished with time; Helen Keller and her indefatigable teacher Annie Sullivan are two of them. Media Theatre’s production of The Miracle Worker is only the latest to introduce William Gibson’s adaptation of Keller’s autobiography, The Story of My Life, to another generation, but it’s a welcome introduction. 

Wendy Rosenfield @ 9:24 AM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Saturday, January 31, 2015, 12:00 PM

By Wendy Rosenfield

for the Inquirer

n Act II Playhouse's Mark Twain Unplugged, Tom Teti, as Twain, remarks, "The works of fine literature are like wine; mine are like water. But everybody drinks water."

Wendy Rosenfield @ 12:00 PM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Saturday, January 31, 2015, 10:01 AM

By Toby Zinman

For the Inquirer

Toby Zinman @ 10:01 AM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Sunday, January 25, 2015, 5:50 PM

By Toby Zinman

For the Inquirer

It doesn't get more authentic than this: Athol Fugard's early play, Sizwe Banzi is Dead, devised in 1972 with two members of his first theatre company, John Kani and Winston Ntshona, has been splendidly remounted. John Kani directs and his son, Atandwa Kani, stars alongside Mncedisi Shabangu in this riveting production from Johannesburg's Market Theatre now at McCarter Theatre Center.

Toby Zinman @ 5:50 PM  Permalink | 0 comments
About this blog

Toby Zinman's night job since 2006 is theater critic for the Inquirer where she reviews New York and London as well as Philadelphia. Her day job: Prize-winning prof at UArts, author of five books about modern and contemporary drama, and doer of scholarly deeds (winner of five NEH grants, Fulbright lecturer at Tel Aviv University, visiting professor in China). She was recently named by American Theatre magazine "one of the twelve most influential critics in America."


Wendy Rosenfield has written freelance features and theater reviews for The Inquirer since 2006. She was theater critic for the Philadelphia Weekly from 1995 to 2001, after which she enjoyed a five-year baby-raising sabbatical. She serves on the board of the American Theatre Critics Association, was a participant in the Bennington Writer's Workshop, a 2008 NEA/USC Fellow in Theater and Musical Theater, and twice was guest critic for the Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival's Region II National Critics Institute. She received her B.A. from Bennington College and her M.L.A. from the University of Pennsylvania. She also is a fiction writer, was proofreader to a swami, publications editor for the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, and spends all her free time working out and driving people places. Follow her on Twitter @WendyRosenfield.


Jim Rutter has reviewed theater for The Inquirer since September, 2011. Since 2006, he covered dance, theater and opera for the Broad Street Review, and has also written for many suburban newspapers, including The Main Line Times. In 2009, the National Endowment for the Arts awarded him a Fellowship in Arts Journalism. Thames & Hudson released his updated and revised version of Ballet and Modern Dance in June, 2012. From 1998 to 2005, he taught philosophy and logic at Drexel, and then Widener University. He also coaches Olympic Weightlifting for Liberty Barbell, and has competed at the national level in that sport since 2001.


Merilyn Jackson regularly writes on dance for The Inquirer and other publications. She specializes in the arts, literature, food, travel, and Eastern European culture and politics. In 2001, she was dance critic in residence at the Festival of Contemporary Dance in Bytom, Poland; in 2005, she received an NEA Critics’ Fellowship to Duke University’s Institute for Dance Criticism. She likes to say that dance was her first love but that when she discovered writing she began to cheat on dance. Now that she writes about dance, she’s made an honest woman of herself, although she also writes poetry.

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