Tuesday, September 16, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

POSTED: Saturday, September 6, 2014, 4:42 PM
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By Merilyn Jackson

For the Inquirer

 At the gala openingof the spectacular new FringeArts building Friday night, the air was charged with so much electricity I was glad it was no longer in use as a water processing plant. Though no danger of electrocution, the crowd that sparkled like the wine could have crushed you. They were there as much to see the Pennsylvania ballet dancers in new works as they were to party and sample Peter Woolsey’s (LaMinette) appetizing treats from his new LaPeg restaurant.

Merilyn Jackson @ 4:42 PM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Saturday, September 6, 2014, 2:21 PM

By Wendy Rosenfield

for the Inquirer

Poor Emilie Krause, or rather, her poor characters. As a member of New Paradise Laboratories’ newer, younger ensemble, she seems to have settled in as the company’s little girl lost--all softness and saucer eyes--last in 27, their depiction of rock-star afterlife, and now in their FringeArts world premiere The Adults. But it’s a privileged position, and a theme NPL founder and director Whit MacLaughlin has been exploring of late with pretty spectacular results.

Wendy Rosenfield @ 2:21 PM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Saturday, September 6, 2014, 12:37 AM

by Toby Zinman

for the Inquirer

How can you bore me? Let me count the ways: 99. Fortunately, we don't have to sit/stand through all 99 Breakups but only 11 in Pig Iron's disappointing, self-indulgent and thoroughly fatuous new work.

Toby Zinman @ 12:37 AM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Friday, September 5, 2014, 9:51 AM

By Toby Zinman

For the Inquirer

With a handsome new home down by the riverside, the Fringe Festival is ready to strut its stuff, starting officially September 5 but actually starting on September 3.  Said stuff to be strutted includes 130 "Neighborhood Fringe" productions plus the ten invited shows of the "Presented Fringe." There is also a new, comfy 225-seat theater with a brasserie and a late-night bar called La Peg run by chef Peter Woolsey. The bar will feature free late-night programming during the Festival, starting with the surprising combo of Martha Graham Cracker's famous drag act plus members of the Philadelphia Orchestra.

Toby Zinman @ 9:51 AM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Friday, September 5, 2014, 4:02 AM
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photo credit: Brian Sanders' JUNK Julia Higdon, rehearsing for Suspended.

Merilyn Jackson

FOR THE INQUIRER

Brian Sanders' new show, Suspended, opened with a gala Thursday night during Neighborhood FringeArts at the headquarters of his troupe, JUNK, at Shiloh Baptist Church. The aging, dilapidated church, having given over its soaring nave to Partners for Sacred Places, is perfect for Sanders' company to build its skyscraper scaffolding and bungee-cord rigging. But Lordy, I sure hope the church elders don’t catch drift of what’s going on in there.

Merilyn Jackson @ 4:02 AM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Thursday, September 4, 2014, 7:50 AM

By Toby Zinman

For the Inquirer

Coulda, shoulda, woulda: that's the premise of Alan Ayckbourn's comedy, Intimate Exchanges.  1812 Productions' take on this complicated script is a lively romp through a marriage on the rocks and what happens when people come to a fork in their road and choose to do one thing rather than another. This very English play is about might-have-beens.

Toby Zinman @ 7:50 AM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Sunday, August 31, 2014, 1:25 PM

 

By Toby Zinman

For the Inquirer

Toby Zinman @ 1:25 PM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Friday, August 8, 2014, 8:44 AM

By Toby Zinman

For the Inquirer

Toby Zinman @ 8:44 AM  Permalink | 0 comments
About this blog
Toby Zinman's night job since 2006 is theater critic for the Inquirer. She also is a contributing writer for Variety and American Theatre magazine. Her day job: Prize-winning prof at UArts, author of four books about four playwrights (Rabe, McNally, Miller, Albee), and doer of scholarly deeds (winner of five NEH grants, Fulbright lecturer at Tel Aviv University, visiting professor in China). Her 'weekend' job as a travel writer provides adventure: dogsledding in the Yukon, ziplining in Belize, walking coast-to-coast across England, and cowboying in the Australian Outback.


Wendy Rosenfield has written freelance features and theater reviews for The Inquirer since 2006. She was theater critic for the Philadelphia Weekly from 1995 to 2001, after which she enjoyed a five-year baby-raising sabbatical. She serves on the board of the American Theatre Critics Association, was a participant in the Bennington Writer's Workshop, a 2008 NEA/USC Fellow in Theater and Musical Theater, and twice was guest critic for the Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival's Region II National Critics Institute. She received her B.A. from Bennington College and her M.L.A. from the University of Pennsylvania. She also is a fiction writer, was proofreader to a swami, publications editor for the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, and spends all her free time working out and driving people places. Follow her on Twitter @WendyRosenfield.


Jim Rutter has reviewed theater for The Inquirer since September, 2011. Since 2006, he covered dance, theater and opera for the Broad Street Review, and has also written for many suburban newspapers, including The Main Line Times. In 2009, the National Endowment for the Arts awarded him a Fellowship in Arts Journalism. Thames & Hudson released his updated and revised version of Ballet and Modern Dance in June, 2012. From 1998 to 2005, he taught philosophy and logic at Drexel, and then Widener University. He also coaches Olympic Weightlifting for Liberty Barbell, and has competed at the national level in that sport since 2001.


Merilyn Jackson regularly writes on dance for The Inquirer and other publications. She specializes in the arts, literature, food, travel, and Eastern European culture and politics. In 2001, she was dance critic in residence at the Festival of Contemporary Dance in Bytom, Poland; in 2005, she received an NEA Critics’ Fellowship to Duke University’s Institute for Dance Criticism. She likes to say that dance was her first love but that when she discovered writing she began to cheat on dance. Now that she writes about dance, she’s made an honest woman of herself, although she also writes poetry.

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