Monday, August 31, 2015

POSTED: Wednesday, February 4, 2015, 10:47 PM

By Toby Zinman

For the Inquirer

Toby Zinman @ 10:47 PM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Monday, February 2, 2015, 9:24 AM

By Wendy Rosenfield

for the Inquirer

There are few true American heroes whose reputations haven’t tarnished with time; Helen Keller and her indefatigable teacher Annie Sullivan are two of them. Media Theatre’s production of The Miracle Worker is only the latest to introduce William Gibson’s adaptation of Keller’s autobiography, The Story of My Life, to another generation, but it’s a welcome introduction. 

Wendy Rosenfield @ 9:24 AM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Saturday, January 31, 2015, 12:00 PM

By Wendy Rosenfield

for the Inquirer

n Act II Playhouse's Mark Twain Unplugged, Tom Teti, as Twain, remarks, "The works of fine literature are like wine; mine are like water. But everybody drinks water."

Wendy Rosenfield @ 12:00 PM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Saturday, January 31, 2015, 10:01 AM

By Toby Zinman

For the Inquirer

Toby Zinman @ 10:01 AM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Sunday, January 25, 2015, 5:50 PM

By Toby Zinman

For the Inquirer

It doesn't get more authentic than this: Athol Fugard's early play, Sizwe Banzi is Dead, devised in 1972 with two members of his first theatre company, John Kani and Winston Ntshona, has been splendidly remounted. John Kani directs and his son, Atandwa Kani, stars alongside Mncedisi Shabangu in this riveting production from Johannesburg's Market Theatre now at McCarter Theatre Center.

Toby Zinman @ 5:50 PM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Thursday, January 22, 2015, 11:27 AM

By Jim Rutter

For THE INQUIRER

I've seen three productions of John Patrick Shanley's Pulitzer- and Tony-Award winning Doubt. The Lantern Theater Company's production is the only one that hasn't projected the ambiguity of the title onto the conflict itself. And this choice generates a taut, 80-minute evening of intense, thought-provoking drama.

@ 11:27 AM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Thursday, January 22, 2015, 11:26 AM

By Wendy Rosenfield

for the Inquirer

InterAct Theatre Company’s world premiere of Jen Silverman’s The Dangerous House of Pretty Mbane examines the “new” South Africa. Post-apartheid, it’s a progressive nation (it was the first country in Africa to legalize same-sex marriage) except when it isn’t. With the 2010 World Cup as its backdrop, foreign journalists arrive to cheer and toast a new day, while for Noxolo and her lover Pretty, lesbians living under the constant threat of violence, little has changed.

Wendy Rosenfield @ 11:26 AM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Wednesday, January 21, 2015, 11:33 PM

By Toby Zinman

For the Inquirer

Noel Coward's delectable Private Lives, now at the Walnut Street Theatre, is what every rom-com aspires to be: laugh-out-loud funny, sexy,  rambunctious, and complete with a happy ending preceded by bad behavior.  Here are characters whose dialogue is clever and naughty as opposed to their contemporary versions who often seem dopey and vulgar. The play requires that everyone be veddy veddy English, knowing all the while that it is all  veddy veddy.

Toby Zinman @ 11:33 PM  Permalink | 0 comments
About this blog

Toby Zinman's night job since 2006 is theater critic for the Inquirer where she reviews New York and London as well as Philadelphia. Her day job: Prize-winning prof at UArts, author of five books about modern and contemporary drama, and doer of scholarly deeds (winner of five NEH grants, Fulbright lecturer at Tel Aviv University, visiting professor in China). She was recently named by American Theatre magazine "one of the twelve most influential critics in America."


Wendy Rosenfield has written freelance features and theater reviews for The Inquirer since 2006. She was theater critic for the Philadelphia Weekly from 1995 to 2001, after which she enjoyed a five-year baby-raising sabbatical. She serves on the board of the American Theatre Critics Association, was a participant in the Bennington Writer's Workshop, a 2008 NEA/USC Fellow in Theater and Musical Theater, and twice was guest critic for the Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival's Region II National Critics Institute. She received her B.A. from Bennington College and her M.L.A. from the University of Pennsylvania. She also is a fiction writer, was proofreader to a swami, publications editor for the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, and spends all her free time working out and driving people places. Follow her on Twitter @WendyRosenfield.


Jim Rutter has reviewed theater for The Inquirer since September, 2011. Since 2006, he covered dance, theater and opera for the Broad Street Review, and has also written for many suburban newspapers, including The Main Line Times. In 2009, the National Endowment for the Arts awarded him a Fellowship in Arts Journalism. Thames & Hudson released his updated and revised version of Ballet and Modern Dance in June, 2012. From 1998 to 2005, he taught philosophy and logic at Drexel, and then Widener University. He also coaches Olympic Weightlifting for Liberty Barbell, and has competed at the national level in that sport since 2001.


Merilyn Jackson regularly writes on dance for The Inquirer and other publications. She specializes in the arts, literature, food, travel, and Eastern European culture and politics. In 2001, she was dance critic in residence at the Festival of Contemporary Dance in Bytom, Poland; in 2005, she received an NEA Critics’ Fellowship to Duke University’s Institute for Dance Criticism. She likes to say that dance was her first love but that when she discovered writing she began to cheat on dance. Now that she writes about dance, she’s made an honest woman of herself, although she also writes poetry.

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