Friday, October 24, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

POSTED: Tuesday, May 20, 2014, 5:42 PM

 

By Toby Zinman

For the Inquirer

Toby Zinman @ 5:42 PM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Tuesday, May 13, 2014, 8:54 AM

By Wendy Rosenfield

for the Inquirer

Wendy Rosenfield @ 8:54 AM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Monday, May 12, 2014, 5:47 PM

By Toby Zinman

For the Inquirer 

"Dinner is always about something."  Or so it was back in the heyday of the D.C. political dinner party, where some crucial vote on some piece of legislation was the hidden agenda, followed by cognac and cigars. This is the 1979 world of the first act of Anthony Giardina's new play, The City of Conversation, when Carter was President and thin, rich, brittle, shrewd hostesses wielded liberal power with wit and charm. It's worth here remembering the Washington adage: "If you don't have a seat at the table, then you're probably on the menu."

Toby Zinman @ 5:47 PM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Saturday, May 10, 2014, 11:24 AM

By Wendy Rosenfield

for the Inquirer

Bristol Riverside Theatre's production ofLittle Shop of Horrors is affectionate and fun, and you and I both know why. No, the show doesn't have any of its contemporaries' trademarks: not Sondheim's sophisticated lyricism, Webber's puffed-up self-importance, Kander and Ebb's slickness, or Ahrens and Flaherty's jaunty appeal. Nonetheless, it's a closet favorite in the hearts of several recent generations of musical-theater lovers.

Wendy Rosenfield @ 11:24 AM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Tuesday, May 6, 2014, 9:20 AM

By Wendy Rosenfield

for the Inquirer

Curio Theatre's had a pretty good run lately, but you wouldn't know it from the way it starts off its newest work, Oedipussy. A comic adaptation of British theater troupe Spymonkey's adaptation of Sophocles' classical tale of father-murdering and mother-loving, they quote from a review ostensibly written by my Inquirer colleague Toby Zinman, calling them "inexperienced middle-aged actors" and griping, "It's like watching a talking book that doesn't talk very well."

Wendy Rosenfield @ 9:20 AM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Sunday, May 4, 2014, 4:43 PM
Blog Image
Maria Konstantinidis and Peter Schmitz in 'Man of La Mancha' (photo: Bill D'Agostino)

By Jim Rutter

For THE INQUIRER

Can you imagine Don Quixote, Cervantes’ massive masterwork cut down to novella size? Writer Dale Wasserman did when he, lyricist Joe Darion and composer Mitch Leigh created their beloved Broadway musical Man of La Mancha, which won five Tony Awards in 1966.  

@ 4:43 PM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Saturday, May 3, 2014, 10:44 PM

By Toby Zinman

For the Inquirer

Billed as "magical realism," Jose Rivera's play, Brainpeople seems more like psychotic realism.  Luna Theater's production of the well-known playwright's one-act--Rivera wrote Marisol and the screenplay for Motorcycle Diaries, among othersfeatures three very accomplished actors in three ridiculous roles.

Toby Zinman @ 10:44 PM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Saturday, May 3, 2014, 12:49 AM

By Toby Zinman

For the Inquirer

So I go to my bookshelf to find Ibsen's Peer Gynt, and discover that I do indeed have a copy—but it's in Norwegian, a souvenir bought in a little shop in a little town high up in the mountains of Norway. A fat lot of good that will do me.  Should I go to the bookstore? To the library? To Gutenberg.org? But no: I decide to see EgoPo's production of Gint (the Americanized title in Romulus Linney's adaptation) as if it were a new work, and just let this famous (but unread!) play reveal itself to me onstage.

Toby Zinman @ 12:49 AM  Permalink | 0 comments
About this blog
Toby Zinman's night job since 2006 is theater critic for the Inquirer. She also is a contributing writer for Variety and American Theatre magazine. Her day job: Prize-winning prof at UArts, author of four books about four playwrights (Rabe, McNally, Miller, Albee), and doer of scholarly deeds (winner of five NEH grants, Fulbright lecturer at Tel Aviv University, visiting professor in China). Her 'weekend' job as a travel writer provides adventure: dogsledding in the Yukon, ziplining in Belize, walking coast-to-coast across England, and cowboying in the Australian Outback.


Wendy Rosenfield has written freelance features and theater reviews for The Inquirer since 2006. She was theater critic for the Philadelphia Weekly from 1995 to 2001, after which she enjoyed a five-year baby-raising sabbatical. She serves on the board of the American Theatre Critics Association, was a participant in the Bennington Writer's Workshop, a 2008 NEA/USC Fellow in Theater and Musical Theater, and twice was guest critic for the Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival's Region II National Critics Institute. She received her B.A. from Bennington College and her M.L.A. from the University of Pennsylvania. She also is a fiction writer, was proofreader to a swami, publications editor for the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, and spends all her free time working out and driving people places. Follow her on Twitter @WendyRosenfield.


Jim Rutter has reviewed theater for The Inquirer since September, 2011. Since 2006, he covered dance, theater and opera for the Broad Street Review, and has also written for many suburban newspapers, including The Main Line Times. In 2009, the National Endowment for the Arts awarded him a Fellowship in Arts Journalism. Thames & Hudson released his updated and revised version of Ballet and Modern Dance in June, 2012. From 1998 to 2005, he taught philosophy and logic at Drexel, and then Widener University. He also coaches Olympic Weightlifting for Liberty Barbell, and has competed at the national level in that sport since 2001.


Merilyn Jackson regularly writes on dance for The Inquirer and other publications. She specializes in the arts, literature, food, travel, and Eastern European culture and politics. In 2001, she was dance critic in residence at the Festival of Contemporary Dance in Bytom, Poland; in 2005, she received an NEA Critics’ Fellowship to Duke University’s Institute for Dance Criticism. She likes to say that dance was her first love but that when she discovered writing she began to cheat on dance. Now that she writes about dance, she’s made an honest woman of herself, although she also writes poetry.

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