Tuesday, July 29, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

POSTED: Friday, July 25, 2014, 6:07 PM
Blog Image
(CLEM MURRAY / Staff Photographer) The Koresh brothers - (from left) Nir, Roni, Alon - with their troupe rehearsing for the Come Together Festival.

At Come Together Festival, Koresh Dance brothers now share stage

By Merilyn Jackson, For The Inquirer

Posted: July 22, 2014

 With the Come Together Festival presenting five nights of dance and the city celebrating the annual Philadelphia Dance Day with free workshops, performances, and a massive dance party on Saturday, you won't be able to miss dance in Philadelphia this week.

Merilyn Jackson @ 6:07 PM  Permalink | 0
POSTED: Sunday, July 20, 2014, 11:03 AM

By Toby Zinman

For the Inquirer

Continuing this summer's exciting trend of experimental theater is Applied Mechanics' We Are Bandits, a fascinating and ambitious show at the Asian Arts Initiative.  Rebecca Wright directs a collective of talented people who wrote and composed this piece.

Toby Zinman @ 11:03 AM  Permalink | 0
POSTED: Saturday, July 19, 2014, 9:43 AM

By Toby Zinman

For the Inquirer

"In the future, everyone will be famous for 15 minutes."   Andy Warhol's fifteen has been the longest in the history of time, and his fame as the artist whose Campbell Soup cans and multiple portraits of Marilyn, lives on. 

Toby Zinman @ 9:43 AM  Permalink | 0
POSTED: Sunday, July 13, 2014, 9:32 AM

By Toby Zinman

For the Inquirer

Flashpoint Theatre does it again: the second show of their summer season (following their opener, Miz Martha) is a knockout, with Ben Dibble giving a performance of stunning virtuosity. Herringbone  is a strange and compelling musical by anybody's standards.

Toby Zinman @ 9:32 AM  Permalink | 0
POSTED: Thursday, June 26, 2014, 3:28 PM

By Wendy Rosenfield

for the Inquirer

Remember Deathtrap, Ira Levin's 1978 murder-mystery thriller? The one that lasted four years on Broadway and was adapted into a Sidney Lumet film starring Dyan Cannon, Michael Caine and Christopher Reeve? The one broadcast on a perpetual loop during HBO's early years? Bucks County Playhouse's current production sparks another mystery: How do you murder a sure thing?

Wendy Rosenfield @ 3:28 PM  Permalink | 0
POSTED: Tuesday, June 24, 2014, 12:21 PM

By Wendy Rosenfield

for the Inquirer

Herb Gardner's A Thousand Clowns is an odd choice for a revival. It's not particularly relevant, and its "work is for squares" credo held more weight back when the American Dream signified middle-class mass uniformity and there was enough of a middle class to include the masses. But, mostly due to its success as a 1965 film starring Jason Robards as Murray Burns, unemployed comic TV writer and default foster dad to nephew Nick, there's still an audience with a fondness for this sort-of romantic sort-of comedy.

Wendy Rosenfield @ 12:21 PM  Permalink | 0
POSTED: Tuesday, June 24, 2014, 9:30 AM
Wendy Rosenfield @ 9:30 AM  Permalink | 0
POSTED: Sunday, June 22, 2014, 11:47 AM

By Toby Zinman

For the Inquirer

Toby Zinman @ 11:47 AM  Permalink | 0
About this blog
Toby Zinman's night job since 2006 is theater critic for the Inquirer. She also is a contributing writer for Variety and American Theatre magazine. Her day job: Prize-winning prof at UArts, author of four books about four playwrights (Rabe, McNally, Miller, Albee), and doer of scholarly deeds (winner of five NEH grants, Fulbright lecturer at Tel Aviv University, visiting professor in China). Her 'weekend' job as a travel writer provides adventure: dogsledding in the Yukon, ziplining in Belize, walking coast-to-coast across England, and cowboying in the Australian Outback.


Wendy Rosenfield has written freelance features and theater reviews for The Inquirer since 2006. She was theater critic for the Philadelphia Weekly from 1995 to 2001, after which she enjoyed a five-year baby-raising sabbatical. She serves on the board of the American Theatre Critics Association, was a participant in the Bennington Writer's Workshop, a 2008 NEA/USC Fellow in Theater and Musical Theater, and twice was guest critic for the Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival's Region II National Critics Institute. She received her B.A. from Bennington College and her M.L.A. from the University of Pennsylvania. She also is a fiction writer, was proofreader to a swami, publications editor for the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, and spends all her free time working out and driving people places. Follow her on Twitter @WendyRosenfield.


Jim Rutter has reviewed theater for The Inquirer since September, 2011. Since 2006, he covered dance, theater and opera for the Broad Street Review, and has also written for many suburban newspapers, including The Main Line Times. In 2009, the National Endowment for the Arts awarded him a Fellowship in Arts Journalism. Thames & Hudson released his updated and revised version of Ballet and Modern Dance in June, 2012. From 1998 to 2005, he taught philosophy and logic at Drexel, and then Widener University. He also coaches Olympic Weightlifting for Liberty Barbell, and has competed at the national level in that sport since 2001.


Merilyn Jackson regularly writes on dance for The Inquirer and other publications. She specializes in the arts, literature, food, travel, and Eastern European culture and politics. In 2001, she was dance critic in residence at the Festival of Contemporary Dance in Bytom, Poland; in 2005, she received an NEA Critics’ Fellowship to Duke University’s Institute for Dance Criticism. She likes to say that dance was her first love but that when she discovered writing she began to cheat on dance. Now that she writes about dance, she’s made an honest woman of herself, although she also writes poetry.

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