Wednesday, August 20, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Lower costs will prompt more people to take their medicine, study says

A study from the Annals of Internal Medicine says cheaper drugs would help reduce the problem of people not actually taking - or refilling - prescription medicine that would treat chronic conditions and avoid more acute and expensive problems.

Lower costs will prompt more people to take their medicine, study says

A new study from the Annals of Internal Medicine says cheaper drugs would help reduce the problem of people not actually taking - or refilling - prescription medicine that would treat chronic conditions and avoid more acute and expensive problems.

The study suggested that various forms of intervention and coordination have varying results.

A link to the AIM site is here and from there you can find a link to a PDF of the study.

The Annals of Internal Medicine is a publication of the American College of Physicians.

The study concluded that, "Reduced out-of-pocket expenses, case management, and patient education with behavioral support all improved medication adherence for more than one condition. Evidence is limited on whether these approaches are broadly applicable or affect long-term medication adherence and health outcomes."

 

David Sell
About this blog
David Sell blogs about the region's pharmaceutical industry. Follow him on Facebook.

For Inquirer.com. Portions of this blog may also be found in the Inquirer's Sunday Health Section.

Reach David at dsell@phillynews.com.

David Sell
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