Wednesday, December 17, 2014

PetMD

POSTED: Friday, July 25, 2014, 1:29 PM
Filed Under: PetMD
Many shelter dogs are euthanized without proper diagnoses. (iStock)

Once upon a time there was a dog named Bobo. Bobo was born to a Lab mix in a lush Miami backyard and by the time he was six weeks old he had been deemed "the cutest pup" by a neighbor’s kids and was taken away from his brothers and sisters to live in another home — which also had a lush backyard. What a lucky pup!

But, as with many other cautionary tales I have told in this space, this one has a sad ending.

Bobo began as a model puppy; which means he pee-peed and poo-pooed on the nice rugs and chewed up socks and tennis shoes and (heavens! the final straw!) even Mommy’s Jimmy Choos! So Bobo was sent outside to live in the lush backyard with the pool and lots of fancy, plastic designer furniture that he liked to chew when no one was around — which was almost always. When the kids did take the time to occasionally play with him he got too rough. They bopped him on the head whenever he did this, but he wouldn’t stop and so they left him alone.

POSTED: Friday, July 25, 2014, 1:29 PM
Filed Under: PetMD
The Veterinary Medicine Mobility Act permits veterinarians to transport controlled substances for use outside of their location of registration. (iStock)

Great news emerged recently from the U.S.. House, which passed an act that is very important to veterinarians, our clients, and our patients: the Veterinary Medicine Mobility Act.

What is the Veterinary Medicine Mobility Act?

The Veterinary Medicine Mobility Act (H.R.. 1528/S. 1171) modifies “the Controlled Substances Act and Drug Enforcement Administration policy that currently prohibits veterinarians from transporting controlled substances to administer and treat patients outside of the registered location.”

POSTED: Friday, July 25, 2014, 1:29 PM
Filed Under: PetMD
Animals are hard-wired to hide signs of illness or pain and will often begin to give an indication that they are sick only after their disease is quite advanced. (iStock)

As doctors, we tend to think of preventative medicine in a very concrete way. It’s the underlying mantra behind our recommendation for routine physical exams, labwork, imaging tests, and screening tests. We want to perform these check-ups when patients are well in order to detect risk factors prior to the development of significant disease.

There’s a great deal of evidence to support the benefit of preventative medicine for people. One study indicated that over half of the deaths in the United States in the year 2000 were due to preventable “behaviors and exposures.” This included deaths from cardiovascular disease, chronic respiratory disease, unintentional injuries, diabetes, and infectious diseases.

It would seem, therefore, that preventative medicine would be our best defense against illness. Yet, nary a few months go by before another study is published indicating that preventative exams, lab tests, or diagnostic procedures are no longer being recommended as they provide no apparent benefit to patients.

POSTED: Friday, July 25, 2014, 1:29 PM
Filed Under: PetMD

Medicating a cat is sometimes one of the most challenging tasks a cat owner must face. But with a little advance preparation, it doesn’t have to be difficult.

Before you attempt to medicate your cat, get all your supplies together. Have the medication handy, along with a treat to make the experience more pleasant for your cat, and a towel for wrapping your cat if necessary.

To give a liquid medication, place your cat on a flat surface, facing away from you with his hindquarters against your body. You should already have the medication drawn up into a dosing syringe. Use your free hand to tilt your cat’s head up slightly. Place the tip of syringe in the back corner of your cat’s mouth, squirting the medication in the space between the cheek and gums. Be sure to reward your cat with a favorite treat afterward.

POSTED: Wednesday, July 23, 2014, 1:29 PM
Filed Under: PetMD
With the season for vacations fast approaching, it’s time to consider whether you will be traveling with your dog or whether you will be leaving her behind. (iStock)

Air Travel with Your Dog

By Victoria Heuer 

With the season for vacations fast approaching, it’s time to consider whether you will be traveling with your dog or whether you will be leaving her behind. Some people find they worry too much when their dog is left behind, but the hassle of air travel with a dog can be overwhelming unless you’ve ironed out all the details.

POSTED: Wednesday, July 23, 2014, 1:29 PM
Filed Under: PetMD
Monoclonal antibody therapy represents a promising option for veterinary patients with a variety of tumors. (iStock)

A few months ago I wrote an article describing a developing monoclonal antibody treatment option for treating B-cell lymphoma in dogs — New Treatment Option for Lymphoma in Dogs. Monoclonal antibody therapy represents a promising option for veterinary patients with a variety of tumors. This type of treatment capitalizes on the animal’s own immune system, using it to specifically target and attack cancer cells while simultaneously affording a reduced risk of systemic side effects when compared to conventional chemotherapy drugs.

Since the time of publishing this article, a group of medical researchers in Vienna, Austria, have put forth the results of a small study describing a new and different monoclonal antibody for dogs. This antibody reacts with the canine version of a cell-surface protein called epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR).

EGFR is mutated in many forms of cancers in both people and animals and are most often found in epithelial cancers, which are tumors of the linings of different organs/tissues. Examples of epithelial tumors include mammary tumors, skin tumors, and lung tumors. Mutations in EGFR can lead to unregulated cell division and growth (e.g., formation of tumors) and can also help cancer cells figure out how to invade into other tissues and spread throughout the body (i.e., metastasize).

POSTED: Wednesday, July 23, 2014, 1:29 PM
Filed Under: PetMD
Puppy strangles is an odd disease. First of all, it tends to only affect puppies younger than four months of age, and for all the world it looks like it should be caused by a bacterial infection. (iStock)

Puppy appointments are one of the great perks of being a veterinarian. It’s hard to be in a bad mood when faced with an adorable bundle of exuberance, which makes puppies suffering from a disease called strangles, or juvenile cellulitis, especially pitiful. They are neither adorable nor exuberant.

Puppy strangles is an odd disease. First of all, it tends to only affect puppies younger than four months of age, and for all the world it looks like it should be caused by a bacterial infection. Affected puppies develop some combination of the following symptoms:

  • facial swelling
  • papules (small, solid, raised masses) around the face and ears
  • pustules (small pockets of pus) around the face and ears that usually rupture and crust over
  • enlarged lymph nodes behind the jaw that may rupture and drain
  • fever
  • poor appetite
  • lethargy
  • joint pain (less common)

To confuse matters, bacteria are often present when samples are taken from the skin, but these infections develop as a result of puppy strangles; they are not its cause. This explains why antibiotic therapy alone is rarely successful in eradicating the disease.

POSTED: Wednesday, July 23, 2014, 1:29 PM
Filed Under: PetMD
Medicating a cat is sometimes one of the most challenging tasks a cat owner must face. But with a little advance preparation, it doesn’t have to be difficult. (iStock)

Medicating a cat is sometimes one of the most challenging tasks a cat owner must face. But with a little advance preparation, it doesn’t have to be difficult.

Before you attempt to medicate your cat, get all your supplies together. Have the medication handy, along with a treat to make the experience more pleasant for your cat, and a towel for wrapping your cat if necessary.

To give a liquid medication, place your cat on a flat surface, facing away from you with his hindquarters against your body. You should already have the medication drawn up into a dosing syringe. Use your free hand to tilt your cat’s head up slightly. Place the tip of syringe in the back corner of your cat’s mouth, squirting the medication in the space between the cheek and gums. Be sure to reward your cat with a favorite treat afterward.

About this blog
Welcome to the philly.com pets blog, where you'll find everything from training tips and tricks, to the latest news on animal shelters and pet events.

Gabrielle Bonghi Philly.com
Amy Worden Inquirer Staff Writer
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