Sunday, February 14, 2016

The 10 most bike-friendly cities

As Philadelphia considers launching a bike-sharing program, you might be wondering just how bike-friendly the city is. WalkScore.com has ranked its most-bikeable large U.S. cities (those with 500,000 or more residents), and Philly is in its top 10. The city has a Bike Score of 68.4, which means it has "some bike infrastructure," Walk Score says. In cities with scores between 70 and 89, "biking is convenient for most trips" and in cities with scores of 90 to 100, "daily errands can be accomplished on a bike," according to the site's methodology, which evaluated bike lanes, hills, destinations and road connectivity, and the percent of commuters who bike to work.

The 10 most bike-friendly cities

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Mayor Nutter takes a bike ride with bike-share vendors around Rittenhouse Square. (DAVID MAIALETTI / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER)<br />
Mayor Nutter takes a bike ride with bike-share vendors around Rittenhouse Square. (DAVID MAIALETTI / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER)

As Philadelphia considers launching a bike-sharing program, you might be wondering just how bike-friendly the city is. WalkScore.com has ranked its most-bikeable large U.S. cities (those with 500,000 or more residents), and Philly is in its top 10. The city has a Bike Score of 68.4, which means it has "some bike infrastructure," Walk Score says. In cities with scores between 70 and 89, "biking is convenient for most trips" and in cities with scores of 90 to 100, "daily errands can be accomplished on a bike," according to the site's methodology, which evaluated bike lanes, hills, destinations and road connectivity, and the percent of commuters who bike to work.

Here's the full list of the 10 most-bikeable large cities. Each city's score is in parenthesis:

1. Portland (70.3)
2. San Francisco (70)
3. Denver (69.5)
4. Philadelphia (68.4)
5. Boston (67.8)
6. Washington, D.C. (65.3)
7. Seattle (64.1)
8. Tucson (64.1)
9. New York (62.3)
10. Chicago (61.5)

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