Friday, April 18, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Archive: March, 2009

POSTED: Tuesday, March 17, 2009, 2:30 AM
Filed Under: Politics, Taxes

Every year, I intend to tackle my taxes early. Every year, I find myself where I am now: just starting with less than a month to go.

The good news for those of you in the same situation is that this Saturday you can get free help from IRS offices and various volunteer sites around the area.

The key is you have to earn $42,000 or less to qualify for free tax-return preparation.

POSTED: Monday, March 16, 2009, 5:28 PM
Filed Under: Politics, Taxes

Here's the list of IRS offices and community locations for tax preparation help for Super Saturday on March 21:

IRS taxpayer assistance centers with hours of operation:

* 801 Old York Rd., Jenkintown; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.

POSTED: Monday, March 16, 2009, 2:30 AM

Corporate annual reports began flooding into the Securities and Exchange Commission last week.

If you own shares in a public company, you really should read the document it files with the SEC called a Form 10-K.

Federal rules require many companies to file their annual reports within 75 days of the end of their fiscal years. Given that most companies use Dec. 31 for their year-end, today is Day 75 for them.

POSTED: Friday, March 13, 2009, 6:00 AM

It’s moving day for Buchanan Ingersoll & Rooney P.C.

The law firm is closed today so that all those leather-bound law books can be lugged from the 14th floor of 1835 Market St. to Two Liberty Place, 50 S. 16th St., a few blocks away.

On Monday morning, Buchanan Ingersoll lawyers and staff will have a new view of the world from their offices on the 31st, 32nd and 33rd floors. The firm signed a 12-year lease for 77,018 square feet in blue-glass office tower in January 2008.

POSTED: Friday, March 13, 2009, 2:30 AM
Filed Under: Small Business | Technology

If new ideas and small businesses are the way we’ll rebuild the U.S. economy, call it a good sign that 11 local early-stage companies just raised a collective $2 million.

The investments were made by Ben Franklin Technology Partners of Southeastern Pennsylvania, and chances are you’ve never heard of any of these companies.

But that’s the point. Ben Franklin money is often the first institutional investment these tiny companies receive as they prototype, beta-test, and do the labwork needed to develop their products.

POSTED: Thursday, March 12, 2009, 4:00 PM
Filed Under: Small Business | Technology

The recession, the credit crisis, the job cuts are the big stories that dominate our business pages. But as entrepreneurs keep reminding me: They're not all folding up their tents and heading for the bunker.

The Mid-Atlantic chapter of a technology group called Mobile Monday is hosting an event on the businesses hoping to profit from social networking and entertainment applications for mobile devices.

Before you roll your eyes, the last event hosted by this group attracted 250 people to the Franklin in January. Even if concept of mobile-everything smacks of relentless hype, there are a lot of entrepreneurs trying to ride this rocket.

POSTED: Thursday, March 12, 2009, 2:52 PM

Quick question: Did anyone go to that Pink Slip Party last night that the staffing company Ajilon set up last night in Center City?

If so, what did you think? This was the networking event focused on financial, accounting, legal and IT professionals who'd lost their jobs recently. Are we going to see more of this kind of event?

Or will the various monthly job fairs or the weekly/monthly jobs club programs or support groups run by organizations like the Philadelphia Unemployment Project that will be more effective?

POSTED: Thursday, March 12, 2009, 2:30 AM

More than 40 years after the start of the biotechnology industry, 2008 was the first year it turned a profit.

So apparently it’s time to make the industry less profitable. Champion of the generic-drug industry U.S. Rep. Henry Waxman (D., Calif.) wants to bring competition to the business of making biologics, which are drugs such as Amgen’s Enbrel and Centocor Ortho Biotech’s Remicade.

Currently, a biotech company can sell a drug without fear a competitor will one day make a new version of it and slash the price. Yesterday, legislation introduced by Waxman and three other lawmakers, including Rep. Frank Pallone Jr. (D., N.J.) would permit the creation of “follow-on biologics.”

About this blog
Mike Armstrong blogs about Philadelphia corporations and business-related topics. Contact him at 215-854-2980. Reach Mike at marmstrong@phillynews.com.

Mike Armstrong Inquirer Columnist
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