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Casper Wells looks back on a wild evening

Casper Wells will never forget his first pitching experience with the Phillies. Wells was the losing pitcher in Saturday’s 12-7 loss in 18 innings to the Arizona Diamondbacks. The time of game was 7 hours and 6 minutes, the longest in both Phillies and Arizona history.

Casper Wells looks back on a wild evening

Diamondbacks´ Adam Eaton scores as Philadelphia Phillies´ pitcher Casper Wells watches in the eighteenth inning of an MLB National League baseball game Saturday, Aug. 24, 2013, in Philadelphia. The Diamondbacks won 12-7. (H. Rumph Jr/AP)
Diamondbacks' Adam Eaton scores as Philadelphia Phillies' pitcher Casper Wells watches in the eighteenth inning of an MLB National League baseball game Saturday, Aug. 24, 2013, in Philadelphia. The Diamondbacks won 12-7. (H. Rumph Jr/AP)

Casper Wells will never forget his first pitching experience with the Phillies. Wells was the losing pitcher in Saturday’s 12-7 loss in 18 innings to the Arizona Diamondbacks. The time of game was 7 hours and 6 minutes, the longest in both Phillies and Arizona history.

Wells, a pitcher in college at Towson University, had thrown a scoreless inning on June 28 with the Chicago White Sox in a 19-10 loss to the Cleveland Indians..

With the score 7-7 against the Diamondbacks, Wells retired the first two batters he faced but walked the speedy Tony Campana, who then scored on Adam Eaton’s double to break the tie.

Wells wouldn’t retire another batter. He allowed five earned runs on three hits and walked three while throwing 40 pitches.

John McDonald came in from left field and gave up two singles before retiring former Phillies minor leaguer Tuffy Gosewisch for the final out.

In addition, Wells went 0 for 7 with four strikeouts.

“I guess it was pretty surreal the whole game,” Well said in the clubhouse before this afternoon’s series finale at Citizens Bank Park against the Diamondbacks. “I am just upset that we didn’t come away with the victory.”

Wells, who was throwing in the low ‘90’s, took the mound with a serious mindset.

“Obviously I was looking to go in there pitching wise and compete, give ourselves a chance our there with the score still tied, a chance to do something,” he said. “It didn’t turn out that way and you have to look on to the next day.”

The next day was actually the same day since the game ended at 2:12 a.m.

Marc Narducci Inquirer Staff Writer
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