Sunday, April 26, 2015

Hamels to miss a start

An MRI exam done on Monday on Cole Hamels' left shoulder showed inflammation behind the rotator cuff, Phillies general manager Ruben Amaro Jr. said.

Hamels to miss a start

An MRI on Cole Hamels revealed shoulder inflammation. (David M Warren/Staff Photographer)
An MRI on Cole Hamels revealed shoulder inflammation. (David M Warren/Staff Photographer)

An MRI exam done on Monday on Cole Hamels' left shoulder showed inflammation behind the rotator cuff, Phillies general manager Ruben Amaro Jr. said.

Hamels will not go on the disabled list but will miss at least one start. Hamels was scheduled to pitch Friday against Washington if the Phillies remained on schedule.

Hamels pitched five innings last Friday against Washington.

"It’s just one of those things, it’s just precautionary," Hamels said before Tuesday night's game against the Diamondbacks. "They wanted me to take [an MRI] and I was more than happy to comply. And I guess it showed everything that I thought was not wrong. Everything looked good and that’s kind of what the feeling was, just making sure everything was good.”

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Hamels was asked if he will miss just one start. “No, it will probably be a month,” Hamels said with a laugh. “No, I think because they had to inject dye, which is very uncomfortable and takes over 24 hours to come out, I’m not supposed to throw for two days. So I don’t think jumping in and throwing a bullpen and then two or three days from now throwing in a game would be wise. So missing one start I don’t think is the end of the world.

“[Missing the start] is because of the dye. That was kind of the deal. I didn’t want the dye injection, but I know to get a better reading I’d rather them have the best view of my shoulder as possible. So I let them do it and everything’s good and obviously the consequences of getting the dye is that it stretches out the days off. So I’ll just be past on my schedule tomorrow.”

Hamels was asked if he was concerned that inflammation was found. “We’ve got five [starting] pitchers and I think they all have inflammation in their shoulder right now," he said. "This is the time of how you’re able to throw through it. And because it was uncomfortable in the last start, maybe there’s more inflammation than [usual]. It’s just a matter of doing the, I guess it would be considered rehab. Just strengthening everything up and trying to slush out the inflammation as fast as possible.

“But in these types of times, especially with the travel we’ve had to do, and so many games, there’s bound to be days where you shoulder isn’t feeling up to speed. I know we’ve all suffered it. It’s just how you respond. My shoulder didn’t respond well last game, but it feels good right now.”

About pitching next week, Hamels said: “Yeah, I’m throwing tomorrow and then I get back on my five-day schedule. Throw tomorrow, I’ve probably got a bullpen in two days and then whenever my spot comes up.”

A reporter asked about how his inflammation was different than the inflammation that Brad Lidge had. Lidge was out four months.

“I don’t know," Hamels said with a laugh. "I’m throwing 90 miles and hour and he wasn’t? I can still throw. I don’t know how to answer that one. That’s all I’ve got.”

Hamels was asked if he was apprehensive going into the MRI?

“No. I knew I had to do it," he said. "I’ve always gone with my gut instinct and I think that’s always what saved me. There’s nothing I really stressed about or was worried about. It’s just a matter complying with what they want and I was more than happy to do that to make things, I guess, more easy for them and me. Because we’ve still got one-and-a-half more months to the season and then postseason and they want me to be as strong as possible. And they obviously want me to be as strong as possible.”

Hamels was asked if there will be limitations when he comes back?

“Like pitch count or something? I’m sure they’ll always do that," he said. "We’re playing really well; trying to throw 120 pitches would probably be a little foolish. Just going out and making one pitch at a time is probably all they can look forward to and it’s all I can probably try to manufacture and see how long I can stretch it out. And then just, boom, get back into strengthening it up, recover and get back as fast as I can and get back for the next start.”

More to come ...

 


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