Saturday, October 25, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

State AG asks judge to put Lancaster kennel out of biz

A judge today said he would decide soon whether to shut down a major Lancaster County dog kennel that has had numerous run-ins with Pennsylvania authorities over the years. In a Commonwealth Court hearing this morning, the state Attorney General’s office argued that CC Pets L.L.C. should be shuttered because it repeatedly violated a four-year-old agreement requiring it to identify itself in classified ads by name or as a licensed kennel. “The defendants have been given enough bites of the apple,” Deputy Attorney General Kathryn Silcox told Commonwealth Court Judge Barry Feudale. “They should be closed down.”

State AG asks judge to put Lancaster kennel out of biz

A judge today said he would decide soon whether to shut down a major Lancaster County dog kennel that has had numerous run-ins with Pennsylvania authorities over the years.

In a Commonwealth Court hearing this morning, the state Attorney General’s office argued that CC Pets L.L.C. should be shuttered because it repeatedly violated a four-year-old agreement requiring it to identify itself in classified ads by name or as a licensed kennel.

“The defendants have been given enough bites of the apple,” Deputy Attorney General Kathryn Silcox told Commonwealth Court Judge Barry Feudale. “They should be closed down.”

Michael Winters, attorney for kennel owners Joyce and Raymond Stoltzfus, didn’t contest many of the allegations but argued that the health of the puppies sold there was no longer in question.

Winters asked Feudale to render a ruling short of closing down the kennel.

After an hour-long morning hearing, Feudale took the matter under advisement and said he would rule on it soon.

The Stoltzfuses in 2005 were the subject of the largest-ever state consumer-fraud settlement involving the sale of sick and defective dogs. They were fined $75,000 in restitution and costs and were required to use their name or the fact that they were a licensed kennel in all subsequent ads.

The state is arguing that they failed to meet that requirement more than 800 times and is asking the court to impose the maximum fine of $5,000 for each violation.
  
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About this blog

Commonwealth Confidential gives you regularly updated coverage of the state legislature, the governor and the workings of the state bureaucracy. It is written by Angela Couloumbis and Amy Worden in the Inquirer's Harrisburg bureau, based right in the statehouse, and by the newspaper's far-flung campaign reporters.



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