Saturday, October 25, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Health watch: FDA issues shampoo warning, low-cost vaccines offered

Beware of hazardous suds. The Federal Drug Administration has issued a warning about an unapproved dog shampoo that could have adverse effects on humans.

Health watch: FDA issues shampoo warning, low-cost vaccines offered

Beware of hazardous suds. The Federal Drug Administration has issued a warning about an unapproved dog shampoo that could have adverse effects on humans.

THe FDA’s Center for Veterinary Medicine is alerting pet owners to use caution with the use of Douxo Seborrhea Shampoo (0.1% phytosphingosine), distributed by Sogeval Laboratories, Inc. of Coppell, Texas.

The FDA received a report of the death of a woman associated with the use of the product on her dog.

A March report describes a woman with severe, preexisting asthma who had a sudden, severe asthma attack and died while bathing a dog using the shampoo. A few days later, another asthmatic family member bathed the dog using the same product and experienced a mild asthma attack but recovered.

FDA is advising consumers with asthma or other respiratory conditions to consider consulting with their physicians prior to use of this product.

FDA is currently investigating this serious issue and will provide additional information as appropriate. The shampoo is widely available on the internet.

A shot saves lives. The Pennsylvania SPCA is offering low-cost vaccines for a highly-contagious feline disease. Cats and kittens are at risk of severe illness and even sudden death from a common virus called feline panleukopenia, caused by the feline parvovirus. The virus can survive up to a year in the environment, so healthy, unvaccinated cats can become infected without ever coming into direct contact with an infected one. The virus is difficult to destroy so it may also be spread by contact with contaminated objects, even if they’ve been washed, such as food bowls, litter pans, bedding, and shared cat carriers, or by people who have been in contact with an infected cat (on hands or clothing, for example).

Symptoms of panleukopenia are loss of appetite, lethargy, vomiting , severe, often bloody, diarrhea, nasal discharge and dehydration but vets at the PSPCA caution that the ability of cats to hide illness means that they may be severely sick by the time they show symptoms. Prevention is dependent on effective vaccination, they say.

For $25, pet owners can receive vaccinations for rabies and panleukopenia in cats or the rabies and distemper vaccinations for dogs. Other discounted vaccinations and services are also available. The clinics are being held this Saturday and Sunday at the PSPCA at 350 E. Erie Avenue. See the PSPCA website for other dates upcoming dates at the PSPCA and other locations.

Diabetes on the rise among cats and dogs. A new report by Banfield Vets, which looked at 2.5 million pet records from its clinics, found that diabetes rates are up 32 percent among dogs and 16 percent among cats.

To learn about which breeds are at risk, what the symptoms are and how the disease is managed, read the U.S. News and World report article.

 

Amy Worden Inquirer Staff Writer
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Amy Worden Inquirer Staff Writer
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