Sunday, September 21, 2014
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Experts say active tick season will bring more Lyme disease

Has anyone been plucking off an unusual number of ticks on their pets or themselves this spring?

Experts say active tick season will bring more Lyme disease

Has anyone been plucking off an unusual number of ticks on their pets or themselves this spring?

I have.

This afternoon our orange tabby cat, Pennsy, who goes outside for daily supervised walks, picked up a tick after about 90 seconds in the grass. Last week my husband came in from mowing the lawn with four ticks on him. As a lifelong outdoors person, I can say I have seen more ticks in the past month on my pets and family than in a whole summer season or more in the past.

Experts say there's a reason for that: a mild winter and warm spring means ticks are more active, earlier than usual. Some are predicting this will be "the worst year yet" for Lyme disease in pets and people.

So go outdoors with your armor on: bug spray with tick repellent, white socks over pant legs and make sure your pets get their regular dose of flea and tick medicine. We've found that while you might find a tick crawling on your pet's fur, by using the topical flea/tick products ticks are prevented from embedding themselves in their skin.

This year we are trying out a new product, Sentry Fiproguard, that is available at PetsMart and contains the same active ingredients as the much more expensive Frontline and Advantage brands. So far, so good.

There is no shortage of natural (chemical free) anti-tick and flea products to try too. If anyone can vouch for their effectiveness please post a comment or let me know.

There are many web sites with information about tick prevention, Lyme disease and that will instruct you on how to remove a tick embedded in your pet's skin. Among the sites to visit is WebMD for pets.

Tick Season Much Worse This Year (via redOrbit)

With all the warm weather we’ve been seeing this Spring, some scientists says there’s a higher threat of Lyme disease, which is transmitted by ticks. Mara Schiavocampo reports.


Amy Worden Inquirer Staff Writer
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Amy Worden Inquirer Staff Writer
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