Saturday, April 18, 2015

POSTED: Thursday, February 12, 2015, 7:55 AM
iStock.

One of the frustrating things about trying to be a consciencious pet parent is not knowing exactly which company makes the food you feed your cat or dog. Often, products are made by one company and marketed under many different names.

That's the case with Tuffy's Pet Foods Inc. of Perham MN. Never heard of that brand? Perhaps you've heard of Dogswell which makes the Nutrisica brand.

We learned last night that Tuffy's is recalling lots of 4 lb bags of Nutrisca Chicken and Chick Pea Recipe Dry Dog Food because they have the potential to be contaminated with salmonella.

Amy Worden @ 7:55 AM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Monday, February 9, 2015, 8:29 AM
A new New Jersey law, which animal welfare advocates say is the toughest in the nation, requires pet stores to make available information - including inspection reports - about the breeders of the puppies they sell and forbid stores from buying puppies from breeders cited for "severe violations" by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. (Photo from nopetstorepuppies.com / SPCA)

Two months ago Gov. Christie chose the Iowa farm lobby over New Jersey voters when he vetoed a bill the majority of New Jersey residents supported banning pig gestation crates.

Last week he listened to animal lovers in his state when he signed the "Pet Store Disclosure" bill.

The new law, which animal welfare advocates say is the toughest in the nation, requires pet stores to make available information - including inspection reports - about the breeders of the puppies they sell and forbid stores from buying puppies from breeders cited for "severe violations" by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Amy Worden @ 8:29 AM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Friday, February 6, 2015, 9:10 AM

Animal welfare advocates speak for the voiceless.

It seems lately the many thousands of voiceless creatures of Pennsylvania are losing - at an alarming rate - those who spoke eloquently and powerfully for them. 

It began in 2013 with the untimely death of Patti Bednarik, a Pittsburgh attorney and member of the Governor's Dog Law Advisory Board, who was instrumental in educating lawyers about animal law and was a leader in the fight for stronger puppy mill laws.

Amy Worden @ 9:10 AM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Thursday, February 5, 2015, 7:18 AM

Police in a Poconos community want to catch those responsible for throwing a small puppy from a car in a parking lot.

The mixed-breed puppy, now named Bonnie Bell, was seen tossed from a vehicle at a Wal-Mart parking lot. So far surveillance tapes have come up empty.

Bonnie Bell was suffering from dehydration and worms and is recovering at the Animal Welfare Society of Monore (ASWSOM)  shelter. Many potential adopters are vying for chance to take her home. Shelter officials took the opportunity to remind the community that kennels are always full and there are many other animals needing homes.


Amy Worden @ 7:18 AM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Tuesday, February 3, 2015, 8:44 AM
In "Dog By Dog," filmmaker Chris Grimes, turns his lens on commercial breeders, politicians and advocates - and at least one journalist to probe the question of how puppy mills continue to thrive despite overwhelming public opposition. (dogbydogdocumentary.com)

In a new documentary, set to be released this year, a Chicago filmmaker explores the role of money and politics in creating and supporting the nation's puppy mill industry and thwarting efforts to improve conditions for thousands of breeding dogs who spend their lives in misery. 

In "Dog By Dog," filmmaker Chris Grimes, turns his lens on commercial breeders, politicians and advocates - and at least one journalist to probe the question of how puppy mills continue to thrive despite overwhelming public opposition.

"I wondered how the guys in overalls were able to mount such opposition," said Grimes in an interview Monday. "So we decided to look at the guys in suits to see how they blocked efforts to fight puppy mills."


Amy Worden @ 8:44 AM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Friday, January 30, 2015, 11:51 AM
Despite an overwhelming vote of the General Assembly and the wide support of voters New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie on Friday vetoed a bill banning crates that severely limit the movement of pregnant pigs in last year.

When New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie vetoed the pig gestation crate bill late last year, there was widespread speculation the move was less about what Christie thought was in the best interest of his Garden State constituents and more about what was best for his future national political career.

Christie called the bill, which would have prohibited the use of the body-gripping tight crates where sows spend most of their lives, "a solution in search of a problem." At the time polls showed nine out of ten New Jersey voters supported it.

After all, Christie said, there were only 9,000 pigs in all of New Jersey.

Amy Worden @ 11:51 AM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Sunday, January 25, 2015, 11:10 PM

For the first time last fall animal-loving voters in Pennsylvania had the opportunity to choose a governor based on where the candidate stood on animal issues.

Both Democrat Tom Wolf and Republican Tom Corbett issued position statements on a wide range of issues affecting animals wild and domestic. Wolf was the Humane PA PAC endorsed candidate last fall and last week he took office as the new governor. Coincidence?

The animal lobby would like to think not.


Amy Worden @ 11:10 PM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Friday, January 16, 2015, 7:55 AM
MIAMI, FL - MARCH 05: People order food in a Chipotle restaurant on March 5, 2014 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

The announcement this week that fast food retailer Chipotle had pulled its carnitas dishes from its menu after discovering that one of its suppliers violated the company's animal welfare policy sent shock waves in a number of directions.

Fans of the product were no doubt disappointed their favorite pork burrito was no longer available in the chain's 600 restaurants and some reporters predicted a financial fallout from such a drastic move.

But few may have been as surprised as animal welfare advocates who have been fighting for humane treatment of production food animals for decades.

Amy Worden @ 7:55 AM  Permalink | 0 comments
About this blog
Amy Worden is a politics and government reporter for the Inquirer. In that capacity she has explored a range of animal issues from dog kennel law improvements and horse slaughter to the comeback of peregrine falcons and pigeon hunts. From hamsters to horses, animals have always been part of her life. To pass along a tip or contact Amy, click here. Reach Amy at aworden@phillynews.com.

Amy Worden Inquirer Staff Writer
Latest Videos:
Also on Philly.com
Stay Connected
Topics: