Sunday, April 26, 2015

Rangers pitcher furious that opposing hitter wanted to score runs, win game

If someone had the gaul to write down the unwritten rules of baseball, there would be some odd additions to baseball's lexicon. If you're a base runner, don't touch the pitcher's mound. If you're a pitcher and the opposing pitcher hits one of your teammates, you now need to hit one of his teammates.

Rangers pitcher furious that opposing hitter wanted to score runs, win game

(Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)
(Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)

If someone had the gaul to write down the unwritten rules of baseball, there would be some odd additions to baseball's lexicon. If you're a base runner, don't touch the pitcher's mound. If you're a pitcher and the opposing pitcher hits one of your teammates, you now need to hit one of his teammates.

Colby Lewis of the Rangers would like to add another: If you are playing against Colby Lewis, you shouldn't try to win very hard.

Colby Rasmus of the Blue Jays saw the hard shift employed by the Rangers' defense, and bunted. It was a good bunt, no one could get to it fast enough, and Rasmus got on base. There were two outs. The Blue Jays were up 2-0.

Lewis started shouting at Rasmus to "swing the bat," and after the game, put together this explanation for his frustration:

More coverage
 
Mr. Met profile reveals history of crotch-punching
 
Ruben Amaro exhausts supply of baseball cliches
 
Taney Dragons provide solid alternative to awful Phillies

"I told [Rasmus] I didn't appreciate it," Lewis said, according to MLB.com. "You're up by two runs with two outs and you lay down a bunt. I don't think that's the way the game should be played... I felt like you have a situation where there is two outs, you're up two runs, you have gotten a hit earlier in the game off me, we are playing the shift, and he laid down a bunt basically simply for average."

Rasmus was confused and explained that he was not there to make the other team happy, he was there to try and win the game. So. What the hell is Lewis talking about?

Why does he talk about a two-run lead as if it's a 12-run lead? Why is it surprising that batters are trying to take advantage of the dramatic defensive shifts in the game today? Why is it offensive for a player on the other team to try and do things that help his team win?

Lewis would be the perfect batterymate for Brian McCann, who shares his opinion that anything that helps the opposing team is bad for baseball.

Sports Producer
About this blog
Pattison Ave. offers an eclectic mix of news and nuggets about Philadelphia sports and beyond. Live chats, analysis, random thoughts, viral videos, odds and ends -- you'll find it all here.

Jonathan Tannenwald Sports Producer
Jerry Gaul Sports Producer
Vaughn Johnson Sports Producer
Justin Klugh Sports Producer
Andrew Albert Sports Producer
Ryan Venezia Sports Producer
Rob Tornoe Sports Cartoonist
Latest Videos:
Also on Philly.com:
Stay Connected