Owls volunteer for Komen for the Cure

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Temple offensive linemen Evan Regas (74) and Scott Roorda (62) gave out water bottles during last year’s Susan G. Koman Philadelphia Race for the Cure. Regas’ mother, Susan Untoria, learned last week that her breast cancer is in remission. (Mitch Leff/Temple University)

Temple’s football team has volunteered to work Sunday’s Susan G. Komen Philadelphia Race for the Cure for the seventh straight season.

 Players and coaches will motivate runners to hand out water bottles during the 5K race/walk event, which raises money to fight breast cancer.

  It’s an event that’s dear to the hearts of Temple linebacker Brandon Chudnoff and offensive linemen Adam Metz and Evan Regas. All three players have mothers, who are survivors of breast cancer.

  Brandon Chudnoff, a redshirt freshman from George Washington High, has participated in the event long before becoming an Owl.

  “Me and my parents, we always organized a bus and get people to walk,” said Chudnoff, whose mother, Sylvita Chudnoff, is a five-year cancer survivor.  

  “We would have a team and we would get t-shirts made.”

  Like Chudnoff, Regas said he be on hand for the event at the Museum of the Art and Eakins Oval area even if Temple wasn’t involved.

  The race “means everything to me,” the Toms River, N.J. native said. “I saw my mom fight for the past four years.

  “So this makes me feel like I can give something back.”

  Last week, Regas’ mother, Susan Untoria, learned her breast cancer went into remission. Even still, Regas said it is still a “tricky situation.”

  “She still has tumors in her chest,” Regas said. “So she still goes and gets chemotherapy.

  “But the [remission] is good news. I mean two months ago, we got news that it spread to her neck and her liver. So this was really a blessing.”

  Metz realizes that his family is also blessed, as his mother, Lisa Metz, has been cancer-free for close to a year.

  “She pretty much just kicked cancer’s [butt],” said Metz, whose mother was diagnosed close to three years ago. “She really just pulled through radiation therapy.

  “I mean you can tell that it obviously takes a toll on you. But she just kept an upbeat attitude.”

  He’s eager to duplicate his mother’s upbeat attitude Sunday while volunteering.

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