Wednesday, August 5, 2015

Should the PFT contract be public?

Tonight, members of the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers will vote on a new three-year contract with the School District of Philadelphia. The agreement will impact more than 17,000 employees, close to 200,000 students, and have major implications for city taxpayers, who foot the bill for public education through property taxes.

Should the PFT contract be public?

0 comments

Tonight, members of the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers will vote on a new three-year contract with the School District of Philadelphia. The agreement will impact more than 17,000 employees, close to 200,000 students, and have major implications for city taxpayers, who foot the bill for public education through property taxes.

Despite the importance of the contract, very little information is available about it -- both the union and the School District have refused to provide specifics. Given how critical this document is to taxpayers, we got to wondering if it's fair that the details are being kept secret. Why shouldn't the public know what's being decided behind closed doors?

The School District did not respond immediately to a request for comment. According to a spokeswoman for the union, teachers need to vote on the agreement before the public learns the terms.

“The PFT-District contract is a lengthy and complex legal document that has taken nearly two years to negotiate,” says Barbara Goodman, communications director for the union. “Even after a tentative agreement is reached, it takes time to arrive at the final wording and requires explanation to put new provisions into context for the members who ultimately will work under it.”

What do you think? Should the public know what's in the contract proposal when the members do? Or should we have to wait until after the vote?

Follow us on Twitter and review city services on our sister site, City Howl.

0 comments
We encourage respectful comments but reserve the right to delete anything that doesn't contribute to an engaging dialogue.
Help us moderate this thread by flagging comments that violate our guidelines.

Comment policy:

Philly.com comments are intended to be civil, friendly conversations. Please treat other participants with respect and in a way that you would want to be treated. You are responsible for what you say. And please, stay on topic. If you see an objectionable post, please report it to us using the "Report Abuse" option.

Please note that comments are monitored by Philly.com staff. We reserve the right at all times to remove any information or materials that are unlawful, threatening, abusive, libelous, defamatory, obscene, vulgar, pornographic, profane, indecent or otherwise objectionable. Personal attacks, especially on other participants, are not permitted. We reserve the right to permanently block any user who violates these terms and conditions.

Additionally comments that are long, have multiple paragraph breaks, include code, or include hyperlinks may not be posted.

Read 0 comments
 
comments powered by Disqus
About this blog
Every year, city government spends slightly more than $4 billion. Where does all that money come from? More importantly, where does it go? Are we getting the most bang for our tax buck? “It's Our Money” is a joint project between Philadelphia Daily News and WHYY, funded by the William Penn Foundation, designed to answer these questions.

It's Our Money contributors

Tips? Comments? Questions?
Contact:

Holly Otterbein:
215-854-5809
hm.otterbein@gmail.com
@hollyotterbein

It's Our Money
Also on Philly.com
letter icon Newsletter