Tuesday, July 29, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Meeting with Rendell and Brady preempts SEPTA union press conference

The union representing SEPTA workers called a press conference for 5:30 p.m. and abruptly cancelled it, saying a meeting with Gov. Ed Rendell and Rep. Bob Brady had lasted longer than expected. According to union spokesman Jamie Horwitz, the discussions were important enough that the union leadership didn't want to leave. “They felt it was inappropriate to break from the meeting for a press conference,” said Horwitz. “Unfortunately, or perhaps fortunately, that meeting [took] a long time.” Horwitz went on to say that the union would likely provide an update on the talks to the public late tonight or early tomorrow. When pressed by reporters about the substance of the talks, Horwitz refused to get specific. Though he said that the length of the talks “could be a good sign,” he said that assessment was “speculative.” He also make clear that SEPTA was not directly involved in the discussions and that no talks between the authority and the union had occurred today.

Meeting with Rendell and Brady preempts SEPTA union press conference

Police and SEPTA employees investigate the scene where a SEPTA R3 West Trenton Regional Train struck and killed a SEPTA employee this morning near the overpass at Chelten and North Eighth Streets in Philadelphia. <a href="http://www.philly.com/philly/news/breaking/20091105_Track_fatality_disrupts_3_regional_rail_lines.html"><b>Read story.</b></a> (Clem Murray / Staff Photographer)
Police and SEPTA employees investigate the scene where a SEPTA R3 West Trenton Regional Train struck and killed a SEPTA employee this morning near the overpass at Chelten and North Eighth Streets in Philadelphia. Read story. (Clem Murray / Staff Photographer)

The union representing SEPTA workers called a press conference for 5:30 p.m. and abruptly cancelled it, saying a meeting with Gov. Ed Rendell and Rep. Bob Brady had lasted longer than expected. According to union spokesman Jamie Horwitz, the discussions were important enough that the union leadership didn't want to leave.

“They felt it was inappropriate to break from the meeting for a press conference,” said Horwitz. “Unfortunately, or perhaps fortunately, that meeting [took] a long time.” Horwitz went on to say that the union would likely provide an update on the talks to the public late tonight or early tomorrow.

When pressed by reporters about the substance of the talks, Horwitz refused to get specific. Though he said that the length of the talks “could be a good sign,” he said that assessment was “speculative.”
He also make clear that SEPTA was not directly involved in the discussions and that no talks between the authority and the union had occurred today.

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