Tuesday, July 22, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Many of Nutter's top staffers have stopped taking pay cuts

You may remember when Mayor Nutter said in the midst of the budget crisis in 2008 that he and his top staffers would be taking pay cuts. But did you know that 22 of Nutter's top aides quietly stopped taking those cuts in January?

Many of Nutter's top staffers have stopped taking pay cuts

Mayor Nutter (presiding at a signing ceremony in April) is again giving up a pay raise this year, but 22 top staffers are keeping theirs for the first time in three years.
Mayor Nutter (presiding at a signing ceremony in April) is again giving up a pay raise this year, but 22 top staffers are keeping theirs for the first time in three years.

You may remember when Mayor Nutter said in the midst of the budget crisis in 2008 that he and his top staffers would be taking pay cuts. But did you know that 22 of Nutter's top aides quietly stopped taking those cuts in January?

Read our article (below), which appeared in the Daily News, below to find out more. You can also listen to our radio report on the topic for WHYY.

In 2008, when Mayor Nutter was proposing unpopular budget cuts to pools and libraries, he was quick to point out that his top staffers would also be taking a pay cut. Starting in 2009, he and his top staffers took salary cuts ranging from 5 percent to 10 percent, as a way to soften the impact of the budget crisis on taxpayers.

Now, after three years of givebacks, 22 of Nutter's top staffers have stopped taking pay cuts.

Deputy Mayor Rina Cutler's salary went from $152,000 back to $160,000. City Solicitor Shelley Smith's went from $165,741 back to $174,464. Federal legislative-affairs director Teresa Gillen's rose from $147,250 back to $155,000.

The top staffers' salaries, which were restored in January, will cost the city an extra $116,400 this year.

Continue reading the story.

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Every year, city government spends slightly more than $4 billion. Where does all that money come from? More importantly, where does it go? Are we getting the most bang for our tax buck? “It's Our Money” is a joint project between Philadelphia Daily News and WHYY, funded by the William Penn Foundation, designed to answer these questions.

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