Saturday, September 5, 2015

Is this the same old false alarm? Or are these budget cuts for real?

As Doron wrote a few minutes ago, it looks like Mayor Nutter is moving forward with about $20 million in additional budget cuts. He announced today that cuts would hit departments across city government, including police officers and firefighters.

Is this the same old false alarm? Or are these budget cuts for real?

0 comments

As Doron wrote a few minutes ago, it looks like Mayor Nutter is moving forward with about $20 million in additional budget cuts. He announced today that cuts would hit departments across city government, including police officers and firefighters.

We've heard threats of drastic cuts from this mayor before. Is this the same old routine?

To be honest, our first response to the news that Nutter would be announcing cuts was to be skeptical. After all, this is the same Mayor who said he would be forced to shut down the entire court system if state lawmakers failed to authorize an increase in the sales tax. Threatening massive service disruptions has been one of Michael Nutter's preferred tactics.

However, this seems different than the “Plan C” fiasco that happened last summer, because there doesn't seem to be any real way to avoid the cuts. It really looks like City Council is not going to back any further tax increases, and the levy on sugary sweetened drinks seems completely dead. But Nutter says that without more revenue, the city will completely run out of money. If that's so, Nutter really only has one option available: cuts.

According to the documents released by the Nutter Administration, there are plans to hire fewer cops, deactivate two fire companies, and reduce library service to just four days a week. That means, after two years of tax increases and mostly invisible cuts, residents are going to feel a meaningful reduction in services.

Of course, we could be wrong (some members of council seem to think so). Maybe this latest turn is a carefully planned strategy designed to force Council back to the table. But we can't help but think that this time, it's for real.

Follow us on Twitter and review city services on our sister site, City Howl.

0 comments
We encourage respectful comments but reserve the right to delete anything that doesn't contribute to an engaging dialogue.
Help us moderate this thread by flagging comments that violate our guidelines.

Comment policy:

Philly.com comments are intended to be civil, friendly conversations. Please treat other participants with respect and in a way that you would want to be treated. You are responsible for what you say. And please, stay on topic. If you see an objectionable post, please report it to us using the "Report Abuse" option.

Please note that comments are monitored by Philly.com staff. We reserve the right at all times to remove any information or materials that are unlawful, threatening, abusive, libelous, defamatory, obscene, vulgar, pornographic, profane, indecent or otherwise objectionable. Personal attacks, especially on other participants, are not permitted. We reserve the right to permanently block any user who violates these terms and conditions.

Additionally comments that are long, have multiple paragraph breaks, include code, or include hyperlinks may not be posted.

Read 0 comments
 
comments powered by Disqus
About this blog
Every year, city government spends slightly more than $4 billion. Where does all that money come from? More importantly, where does it go? Are we getting the most bang for our tax buck? “It's Our Money” is a joint project between Philadelphia Daily News and WHYY, funded by the William Penn Foundation, designed to answer these questions.

It's Our Money contributors

Tips? Comments? Questions?
Contact:

Holly Otterbein:
215-854-5809
hm.otterbein@gmail.com
@hollyotterbein

It's Our Money
Also on Philly.com
letter icon Newsletter