Friday, July 11, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

How could DROP not be a political burden?

In today's Daily News, Catherine Lucey takes a look at which Council members are likely to "retire," collect DROP payments and then run for office again. She also raises this question, for those members who do:

How could DROP not be a political burden?

In today's Daily News, Catherine Lucey takes a look at which Council members are likely to "retire," collect DROP payments and then run for office again. She also raises this question, for those members who do:

Will DROP become a political burden, or will the power of incumbency carry them to re-election?

At first glance, it's surprising that there would be any doubt about this. In our experience (which admittedly may not be representative, but still), very few things rile up people who follow politics in Philly quite like councilmembers collecting DROP payments. And rightly so. It's egregious. But the universe of people who follow politics in Philly isn't as big as the universe of people who vote for council, and, as Catherine notes, incumbency is a very powerful tool. So it's a fair question.

What's to be done? Read the story, get riled up, tell your friends.

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Every year, city government spends slightly more than $4 billion. Where does all that money come from? More importantly, where does it go? Are we getting the most bang for our tax buck? “It's Our Money” is a joint project between Philadelphia Daily News and WHYY, funded by the William Penn Foundation, designed to answer these questions.

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