Sunday, March 29, 2015

For what it's worth, the Boston Superintendent turned down a pay raise earlier this month

From the Boston Herald, on July 6th:

For what it's worth, the Boston Superintendent turned down a pay raise earlier this month

From the Boston Herald, on July 6th:

[Superintendent Carol] Johnson told the Herald she won’t take any pay hikes or bonuses during the rest of her contract in Boston.

“I don’t think in a period where schools are cutting resources for children, any of us can expect to take raises,” Johnson said.

Johnson’s contract pays her an annual salary of $275,000 through June 30, 2012. She has also refused annual performance bonuses, a 2.5 percent pay raise each year and a $600-a-month car allowance.

“I don’t expect anyone to do what I’m doing,” said Johnson, the city’s highest-paid worker. “But in the public sector, you’re held to a higher standard of accountability with the use of public resources, and that’s how it should be.”

This is not to say there aren't concerns about administrator pay in Boston, as you can see if you click through. Johnson is the highest paid city employee in Boston.

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