Monday, September 22, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Daily News: Does anyone have a plan for Plan C?

We like to think Ben got people wondering whether there's something-not-quite-right with Plan C. Today's Daily News editorial pushes the questions a lot further, pointing out that the word "Plan" is really a misnomer for the cuts Nutter has proposed:

Daily News: Does anyone have a plan for Plan C?

We like to think Ben got people wondering whether there's something-not-quite-right with Plan C. Today's Daily News editorial pushes the questions a lot further, pointing out that the word "Plan" is really a misnomer for the cuts Nutter has proposed:

A city shutting down major services including the courts, with major layoffs of cops and firefighters, is a city in a state of emergency - maybe not according to FEMA, but certainly according to its citizens. And the mayor who initiates that state of emergency - for whatever reason - needs to be talking with citizens about exactly how he's going to lead the city through this catastrophe, and how the city is going to function without those things.

Citizens need to know, despite the fact that police and fire services are being cut, health centers closed, weekly trash pickup curtailed and courts shutting down, that the city is not going to fall apart because the mayor has a strategy for dealing with the consequences. Without that strategy, Plan C is not a plan, it's a to-do list.

Some of the specific questions the DN asks that the city hasn't answered:

How will the mayor ensure the safety of citizens with firefighter jobs being cut? What's the deployment strategy?

How will the city ensure the safety of children who use the libraries as after-school havens? What arrangements should parents be making to find alternate locations? Will the school district step in?

Where can people who need access to computers go to look for jobs and write resumes?

How exactly do parks close? Does it mean we can't sit on a bench? Can rec-center basketball courts be used?

If the city goes to every-other-week trash collection, how does City Hall plan to ensure that health issues won't be a problem? Who will be responsible for keeping the streets clean?

Who's going to kill the rats that will be running through people's garbage?

Good questions all. If Plan C is for real, the mayor has put himself in a bad spot. He's been going on and on about how bad Plan C will be; now, it's his job to tell everyone that everything will be OK.

About this blog
Every year, city government spends slightly more than $4 billion. Where does all that money come from? More importantly, where does it go? Are we getting the most bang for our tax buck? “It's Our Money” is a joint project between Philadelphia Daily News and WHYY, funded by the William Penn Foundation, designed to answer these questions.

It's Our Money contributors

Tips? Comments? Questions?
Contact:

Holly Otterbein:
215-854-5809
hm.otterbein@gmail.com
@hollyotterbein

It's Our Money
Also on Philly.com
Stay Connected